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The separation of lower and higher attaining pupils in the transition from primary to secondary schools: a longitudinal study of London

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  • Richard Harris

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    Abstract

    This paper uses methods of spatial analysis to show that lower and higher attaining pupils are separating from each other as they make the transition from primary to secondary schools in London. The observation is not simply a function of geography – that some places are more affluent, with a link between wealth and educational advantage – because separations emerge between locally competing secondary schools: those that are drawing their intakes from the same primary schools. Whilst the separations are partly exacerbated by selective and by faith schools, in all but one year during the period 2003‐8 they remain statistically significant even when those schools are omitted. However, there is no evidence to suggest the separation of lower and higher attaining pupils is getting worse or better, suggesting the geographical determinants of “choice” are strong and not easily changed.

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    File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2011/wp257.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 11/257.

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    Length: 28 pages
    Date of creation: Mar 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:11/257

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    Related research

    Keywords: primary school; secondary school; transition; London; spatial analysis;

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    1. Stephen Gibbons & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2006. "Are schools drifting apart? Intake stratification in English secondary schools," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19420, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Rebecca Allen & Anna Vignoles, 2006. "What Should an Index of School Segregation Measure?," CEE Discussion Papers 0060, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    3. Michael Poulsen & Ron Johnston & James Forrest, 2001. "Intraurban ethnic enclaves: introducing a knowledge-based classification method," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(11), pages 2071-2082, November.
    4. Ron Johnston & Kelvyn Jones, 2010. "Measuring segregation—a cautionary tale," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(6), pages 1264-1270, June.
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    Cited by:
    1. Richard Harris, 2011. "Measuring social segregation between London’s secondary schools, 2003 – 2008/9," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/260, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

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