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Recruiting via Internet

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  • Christian Grund

Abstract

The internet virtually revolutionized the possibilities of employee recruiting. First of all, this contribution undertakes a description of the market. Then, advantages and possible problems of the recruitment via internet are discussed. The empirical study analyses the issues, which persons search for and find a new job via internet and which consequences arise for these persons. The results include that rather well educated persons find jobs with long working hours via internet. Controlling for several individual and job-based characteristics no differences with regard to wages and job satisfaction are found compared to other ways of recruiting.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Bonn, Germany in its series Bonn Econ Discussion Papers with number bgse18_2005.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bon:bonedp:bgse18_2005

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Postal: Bonn Graduate School of Economics, University of Bonn, Adenauerallee 24 - 26, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Fax: +49 228 73 6884
Web page: http://www.bgse.uni-bonn.de

Related research

Keywords: Job satisfaction; Job search; Internet; Matching; Recruiting; Wages;

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