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Interest rates and the channels of monetary transmission: some sectoral estimates

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  • Spencer Dale
  • Andrew Haldane

Abstract

The monetary transmission mechanism describes the channels through which changes in monetary policy affect the policy target, price inflation. Understanding the transmission mechanism is thus central to the successful conduct of monetary policy. This paper uses a Vector AutoRegressive (VAR) methodology to uncover a number of stylised features of the monetary transmission process in the UK. In particular, close attention is paid to the role played by money and credit as intermediate channels. The possibility that the transmission mechanism may differ across sectors is allowed for by estimating separate VARs for the personal and corporate sectors. Three policy conclusions emerge. First, as suggested by Classical Theory, monetary policy is output neutral over the longer term. Second, the lags between changes in monetary policy and its effect upon prices are lengthy (at least 18 months). And third, that aggregate measures of money and credit may provide blurred signals of the impact of monetary policy in final variables. Sectoral measures of bank deposits (for companies) and bank credit (for persons) provide the more timely intermediate indicators.

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File URL: http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/archive/Documents/historicpubs/workingpapers/1993/wp18.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Bank of England in its series Bank of England working papers with number 18.

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Date of creation: Sep 1993
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Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:18

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  1. Spencer Dale & Andrew Haldane, 1993. "Interest rate control in a model of monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 17, Bank of England.
  2. Mark L. Gertler, 1988. "Financial Structure and Aggregate Economic Activity: An Overview," NBER Working Papers 2559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 1990. "New Evidence on the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 21(1), pages 149-214.
  4. Ben S. Bernanke & Alan S. Blinder, 1989. "The federal funds rate and the channels of monetary transmission," Working Papers 89-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  5. Berger, Allen N & Udell, Gregory F, 1992. "Some Evidence on the Empirical Significance of Credit Rationing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 1047-77, October.
  6. Kashyap, Anil K & Stein, Jeremy C & Wilcox, David W, 1993. "Monetary Policy and Credit Conditions: Evidence from the Composition of External Finance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 78-98, March.
  7. Christopher A. Sims, 1980. "Comparison of Interwar and Postwar Business Cycles: Monetarism Reconsidered," NBER Working Papers 0430, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
  9. Brunner, Karl & Meltzer, Allan H, 1972. "Money, Debt, and Economic Activity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(5), pages 951-77, Sept.-Oct.
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