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Carpooling and Congestion Pricing: HOV and HOT Lanes

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Author Info

  • Hideo Konishi

    ()
    (Boston College)

  • Se-il Mun

    (Kyoto University)

Abstract

It is often argued in the US that HOV (high occupancy vehicle) lanes are wasteful and should be converted to HOT (high occupancy vehicles and toll lanes). In this paper, we construct a simple model of commuters using a highway with multiple lanes, in which commuters are heterogeneous in their carpool organization costs. We first look at the HOV lanes and investigate under what conditions introducing HOV lanes is socially beneficial. Then we examine whether converting HOV lanes to HOT lanes improves the efficiency of road use. It is shown that the result depends on functional form and parameter values. We also discuss the effect of alternative policies: simple congestion pricing without lane division; and congestion pricing with HOV lanes. The analysis using specific functional form is presented to explicitly obtain the conditions determining the rankings of HOV, HOT, and other policies based on aggregate social cost.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Boston College Department of Economics in its series Boston College Working Papers in Economics with number 719.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2009
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Publication status: published, Regional Science and Urban Economics 40, 173-186, 2010
Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:719

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Keywords: HOV lanes; HOT lanes; congestion pricing; transportation economics;

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References

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  1. Small, Kenneth A., 1997. "Economics and Urban Transportation Policy in the United States," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7mz1326k, University of California Transportation Center.
  2. Small, K.A. & Yan, J., 1999. "The Value of "Value Princing" of Roads: Second-Best Pricing and Product Differentiation," Papers 99-00-02, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
  3. Small, Kenneth A. & Winston, Clifford & Yan, Jia, 2006. "Differentiated Road Pricing, Express Lanes and Carpools: Exploiting Heterogeneous Preferences in Policy Design," Working paper 189, Regulation2point0.
  4. Parry, Ian & Harrington, Winston & Nelson, Per-Kristian & Safirova, Elena & Mason, Dave & Gillingham, Kenneth, 2003. "Welfare and Distributional Effects of Road Pricing Schemes for Metropolitan Washington, DC," Discussion Papers dp-03-57, Resources For the Future.
  5. Yang, Hai & Huang, Hai-Jun, 1999. "Carpooling and congestion pricing in a multilane highway with high-occupancy-vehicle lanes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 139-155, February.
  6. Reitman, David, 1991. "Endogenous Quality Differentiation in Congested Markets," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(6), pages 621-47, December.
  7. Dahlgren, Joy, 1998. "High occupancy vehicle lanes: Not always more effective than general purpose lanes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 99-114, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Furuhata, Masabumi & Dessouky, Maged & Ordóñez, Fernando & Brunet, Marc-Etienne & Wang, Xiaoqing & Koenig, Sven, 2013. "Ridesharing: The state-of-the-art and future directions," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 28-46.
  2. Michael Janson & David Levinson, 2013. "HOT or Not: Driver Elasticity to Price on the MnPASS HOT Lanes," Working Papers 000111, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  3. Bento, Antonio M. & Hughes, Jonathan E. & Kaffine, Daniel, 2013. "Carpooling and driver responses to fuel price changes: Evidence from traffic flows in Los Angeles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 41-56.
  4. Su, Qing & Zhou, Liren, 2012. "Parking management, financial subsidies to alternatives to drive alone and commute mode choices in Seattle," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 88-97.

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