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Plans And Preferences Of Older American Workers

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Author Info

  • Joseph F. Quinn

    (Department of Economics, Boston College)

  • Richard V. Burkhauser

    (Syracuse University)

Abstract

The study compares the retirement plans and preferences of a recent sample of older Americans. The Data suggest that a substantial minority of older workers expect to retire earlier than they really want to, and that many would delay retirement under different terms and conditions of employment. We conclude that, although most older Americans cannot or do not want to work, many do, and these represent a significant underutilized labor market resource.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Boston College Department of Economics in its series Boston College Working Papers in Economics with number 229.

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Date of creation: Dec 1993
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:229

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Postal: Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill MA 02467 USA
Phone: 617-552-3670
Fax: +1-617-552-2308
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Web page: http://fmwww.bc.edu/EC/
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Cited by:
  1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Joseph F. Quinn, 1997. "Pro-Work Policy Proposals for Older Americans in the 21st Century," Center for Policy Research Policy Briefs 9, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  2. Joseph Quinn, . "New Paths to Retirement," Pension Research Council Working Papers 98-10, Wharton School Pension Research Council, University of Pennsylvania.
  3. Joseph F. Quinn & Michael Kozy, 1995. "The Roles of Part-time Work and Self-employment in the Retirement Transition: A Preliminary View from the HRS," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 292., Boston College Department of Economics.
  4. Joseph F. Quinn & Timothy Smeeding, 1997. "Cross-National Patterns of Labor Force Withdrawal," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 371, Boston College Department of Economics.
  5. Richard V. Burkhauser & Joseph F. Quinn, 1997. "Implementing Pro-Work Policies for Older Americans in the Twenty-First Century," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 378, Boston College Department of Economics.

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