Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Run-up in the House Price-Rent Ratio: How Much Can Be Explained by Fundamentals?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Kamila Sommer

    ()
    (Georgetown University, FRB Minneapolis)

  • Paul Sullivan

    ()
    (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

  • Randal Verbrugge

    ()
    (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Abstract

This paper studies the joint dynamics of real house prices and rents over the past decade. We build a dynamic general equilibrium stochastic life cycle model of housing tenure choice with fully speci?ed markets for homeownership and rental properties, and endogenous house prices and rents. Houses are modeled as discrete-size durable goods which provide shelter services, confer access to collateralized borrowing, provide sizeable tax advantages, and generate rental income for homeowners who choose to become landlords. Mortgages are available, but home-buyers must satisfy a minimum down payment requirement, and home sales and purchases are subject to lumpy ad- justment costs. Lower interest rates, relaxed lending standards, and higher incomes are shown to account for over one-half of the increase in the U.S. house price-rent ratio between 1995 and 2005, and to generate the pattern of rapidly growing house prices, sluggish rents, increasing homeownership, and rising household indebtedness observed in the data. The model highlights the importance of accounting for equilib- rium interactions between the markets for owned and rented property when analyzing the housing market. These general equilibrium e¤ects can either magnify or reverse the partial equilibrium e¤ects of changes in fundamentals on house prices, rents, and homeownership.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.bls.gov/ore/pdf/ec100090.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in its series Working Papers with number 441.

as in new window
Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bls:wpaper:ec100090

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 2 Massachusetts Avenue, N.E. Room 2860, Washington, D. C. 20212
Phone: (202) 606-5900
Fax: (202) 606-7890
Email:
Web page: http://www.bls.gov
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: house price; rent; house price-rent ratio; housing market equilibrium;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Antonia Díaz & Maria Jose Luengo-Prado, 2006. "The Wealth Distribution With Durable Goods," Economics Working Papers we067027, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  2. Ortalo-Magne, Francois & Rady, Sven, 1999. "Boom in, bust out: Young households and the housing price cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 755-766, April.
  3. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Rady, 2002. "Housing Market Dynamics: On the Contribution of Income Shocks and Credit Constraints," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 02-01, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
  4. Antonia Díaz & Maria J. Luengo-Prado, 2006. "On The User Cost and Homeownership," Working Papers 2006-14, FEDEA.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Dennis Epple & Luis Quintero & Holger Sieg, . "Estimating Hedonic Functions for Rents and Values in the Presence of Unobserved Heterogeneity in the Quality for Housing," GSIA Working Papers 2013-E26, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  2. Viktor Dorofeenko & Gabriel S. Lee & Kevin D. Salyer, 2011. "Rationale Erklärungen für Immobilienpreis‐Bubbles: Die Auswirkungen von Risikoschocks auf die Wohnimmobilienpreisvolatilität und die Volatilität von Investitionen in Wohnimmobilien," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(2), pages 151-169, 05.
  3. Solomon, Bernard Daniel, 2010. "Firm leverage, household leverage and the business cycle," MPRA Paper 26504, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Shaofeng Xu, 2013. "An Equilibrium Analysis of the Rise in House Prices and Mortgage Debt," Working Papers 13-9, Bank of Canada.
  5. Yongqiang Chu, 2014. "Credit constraints, inelastic supply, and the housing boom," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), pages 52-69, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bls:wpaper:ec100090. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gregory Kurtzon).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.