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Mobility of Students and Quality of Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of the “Unified Brain Drain” Model

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  • Elise S. Brezis

    ()
    (Bar-Ilan University)

  • Ariel Soueri

Abstract

Globalization has led to a vast flow of migration of workers but also of students. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the migration of individuals encompassing decisions already at the level of education. We present a “unified brain” drain model that incorporates the decisions of an individual related to migration vis‐à‐vis both education and work. In the empirical part, this paper addresses international flows of migration within the Bologna Process and presents strong evidence of concentration of students in countries with high‐quality education.

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File URL: http://econ.biu.ac.il/files/economics/working-papers/2013-11_0.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013-11.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:biu:wpaper:2013-11

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Keywords: Brain drain; Globalization; Higher education; Human capital; Migration; Mobility; Bologna process;

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  1. Donata Bessey, 2012. "International student migration to Germany," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 345-361, February.
  2. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
  3. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  4. Dominique M. Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2003. "The Role of Cultural Clustering in Attracting New Immigrants," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(2), pages 295-318.
  5. Panu Poutvaara, 2004. "Public Education in an Integrated Europe: Studying to Migrate and Teaching to Stay?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1369, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Bénassy, Jean-Pascal & Brezis, Elise S., 2013. "Brain drain and development traps," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 15-22.
  7. Docquier, Frédéric, 2006. "Brain Drain and Inequality Across Nations," IZA Discussion Papers 2440, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Heaton, Christopher & Throsby, David, 1998. "Benefit-Cost Analysis of Foreign Student Flows from Developing Countries: The Case of Postgraduate Education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 117-126, April.
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