Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Endogenous Growth, Population Growth and the Repugnant Conclusion

Contents:

Author Info

  • Simone Marsiglio

    (University of Milan)

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of endogenous population change on economic growth, analyzing the simplest optimal endogenous growth model, an AK type model, driven by human capital accumulation. We show that in steady state both demographic change and economic growth are constant, but the rate of these growth can be positive, negative or null accordingly to parameter values. Population dynamics is determined by the difference between the stationary fertility rate and the exogenous mortality rate: if this is positive population size indefinitely increases, otherwise it reaches a stationary level, which can be positive (if the difference is null) or null (if it is negative). If fertility is strictly lower than mortality, population size will constantly decrease in finite time and we end up with a complete collapse of the economy, characterized by the total extinction of the population. We also analyze the problem of optimal population size and its relationship with growth. The seminal work of Parfit (1984) suggests that total utilitarianism leads to increase population size indefinitely, even if it the average welfare tends to zero. We show that in our model economy, under certain parametric conditions, the repugnant conclusion holds; in particular, this happens when consumption growth is negative and the stationary fertility rate is higher than the exogenous mortality rate.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://services.bepress.com/unimi/economics/art39
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universitá degli Studi di Milano in its series UNIMI - Research Papers in Economics, Business, and Statistics with number unimi-1103.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 12 Apr 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bep:unimip:unimi-1103

Note: oai:cdlib1:unimi-1103
Contact details of provider:
Postal: Via Conservatorio 7 - 20122 Milano
Phone: +39 02 503 16486
Fax: +39 02 503 16475
Web page: http://services.bepress.com/unimi
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Economic Growth; Human Capital Accumulation; Endogenous Fertility; Optimal Population; Repugnant Conclusion;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Marsiglio, Simone & La Torre, Davide, 2012. "Population dynamics and utilitarian criteria in the Lucas–Uzawa Model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 1197-1204.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bep:unimip:unimi-1103. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.