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European Migration: Welfare Migration or Economic Migration?

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Author Info

  • Pavel Svaton

    (Middlebury College)

  • Thierry Warin

    (Department of Economics, Middlebury College)

Abstract

This paper presents an empirical assessment of bilateral migration flows into the EU-15 countries. Using an extended gravity model, it identifies economic, welfare state, geo-spatial and linguistic variables as the principal determinants of migration flows into the EU-15 countries. The empirical analysis uncovers that welfare state provisions in the host country attract disproportionately more migrants from the Central and Eastern European countries and in particular from the developing countries than they do from other EU-15 countries. Immigrants from the developing world are attracted by old age benefits, family and children benefits, and social exclusion benefits and immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe are attracted by sickness and healthcare benefits and family and children benefits. In contrast, intra-EU-15 migration is also influenced by welfare state aspects but to a much lower degree. Our empirical findings lend some support for a more unified or at least better coordinated social policy across the European Union.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Trade and Finance Association in its series International Trade and Finance Association Conference Papers with number 1095.

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Date of creation: 27 Jul 2007
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Handle: RePEc:bep:itfapp:1095

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Cited by:
  1. Simpson, Nicole & Sparber, Chad, 2010. "The Short-and Long-Run Determinants of Unskilled Immigration into US States," Working Papers 2010-06, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  2. Nicole B. Simpson & Chad Sparber, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Less- Educated Immigrant Flows into U.S. States," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1226, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Gail Pacheco & Stephanie Rossouw & Joshua Lewer, 2013. "Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 110(1), pages 1-15, January.
  4. Simpson, Nicole B. & Sparber, Chad, 2012. "The Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Less-Educated Immigration into U.S. States," IZA Discussion Papers 6437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Jana Tepperov√° & Stanislav Klazar, 2012. "The Impact of Social Systems and their Coordination on Economic Migration," Politick√° ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(4), pages 505-522.
  6. Jack DeWaard & Keuntae Kim & James Raymer, 2012. "Migration Systems in Europe: Evidence From Harmonized Flow Data," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1307-1333, November.
  7. Ilse Ruyssen & Gerdie Everaert & Glenn Rayp, 2014. "Determinants and dynamics of migration to OECD countries in a three-dimensional panel framework," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 175-197, February.

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