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Taking Chances: The Effect of Growing Up on Welfare on the Risky Behaviour of Young People

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  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark
  • Chris Ryan
  • Ana Sartbayeva

Abstract

We analyze the effect of growing up on welfare on young people’s involvement in a variety of social and health risks. Young people in welfare families are much more likely to take both social and health risks. Much of the apparent link between family welfare history and risk taking disappears, however, once we account for family structure and mothers’ decisions regarding their own risk taking and investment in their children. Interestingly, we find no significant effect of socio-economic status per se. Overall, we find no evidence that growing up on welfare causes young people to engage in risky behavior.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 604.

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Date of creation: Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:604

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Keywords: youths; welfare; risky behaviour; socio-economic disadvantage;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Trinh Le, 2013. "Does Participation in Extracurricular Activities Reduce Engagement in Risky Behaviours?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n35, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Kassenböhmer, Sonja C. & Le, Trinh & McVicar, Duncan & Zhang, Rong, 2013. ""High"-School: The Relationship between Early Marijuana Use and Educational Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 7790, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Kassenböhmer, Sonja C. & Le, Trinh & McVicar, Duncan & Zhang, Rong, 2013. "Is There an Educational Penalty for Being Suspended from School?," IZA Discussion Papers 7794, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Alison L. Booth & Pamela Katic, 2013. "Cognitive Skills, Gender and Risk Preferences," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(284), pages 19-30, 03.

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