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Performance Related Pay

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Author Info

  • Booth, A-L
  • Frank, J

Abstract

Performance-related pay has been much advocated by governments as a means of promoting labour market flexibility and generating higher productivity. The UK government has been in th lead in providing incentives for profit-related pay, one particular form of performance-related pay (PRP). This paper adopts a different approach to measurement of the impact of PRP on productivity.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 364.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:364

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Related research

Keywords: PRODUCTIVITY ; WAGE DETERMINATION ; PAYMENT SYSTEMS;

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Cited by:
  1. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2009. "Poaching, Courts, and Settlements:Complementarity of Governance in Labor Markets," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f145, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 21 Jan 2014.
  2. Lucifora, Claudio & Origo, Federica, 2012. "Performance Related Pay and Firm Productivity: New Evidence from a Quasi-Natural Experiment in Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 6483, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Sue Fernie & David Metcalf, 1998. "(Not)hanging on the telephone: payment systems in the new sweatshops," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20275, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Chia-ying Liu & Juin-jen Chang, 2011. "Macroeconomic implications of a sharing compensation scheme in a model of endogenous growth," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 102(1), pages 57-75, January.
  5. Hasnain, Zahid & Manning, Nick & Pierskalla Henryk, 2012. "Performance-related pay in the public sector : a review of theory and evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6043, The World Bank.
  6. Edward P. Lazear, 2000. "Performance Pay and Productivity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1346-1361, December.
  7. Pouliakas, Konstantinos & Theodoropoulos, Nikolaos, 2011. "The Effect of Variable Pay Schemes on Workplace Absenteeism," IZA Discussion Papers 5941, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Cowling, Marc, 2007. "Performance Related Pay Coverage in the UK," MPRA Paper 1619, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Sue Fernie & David Metcalf, 1998. "(Not)Hanging on the Telephone: Payment systems in the New Sweatshops," CEP Discussion Papers dp0390, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

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