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Frequency Effects on Predictability of Stock Returns

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  • Pawe{\l} Fiedor

Abstract

We propose that predictability is a prerequisite for profitability on financial markets. We look at ways to measure predictability of price changes using information theoretic approach and employ them on all historical data available for NYSE 100 stocks. This allows us to determine whether frequency of sampling price changes affects the predictability of those. We also relations between price changes predictability and the deviation of the price formation processes from iid as well as the stock's sector. We also briefly comment on the complicated relationship between predictability of price changes and the profitability of algorithmic trading.

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File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1310.5540
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1310.5540.

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Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision: Nov 2013
Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1310.5540

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Web page: http://arxiv.org/

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  1. Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "High Frequency Trading and the New-Market Makers," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-076/2/DSF21, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Aug 2011.
  2. Gili Yen & Cheng-few Lee, 2008. "Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH): Past, Present and Future," Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies (RPBFMP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 11(02), pages 305-329.
  3. Youwei Li & Xue-Zhong (Tony) He, 2005. "Heterogeneity, Profitability and Autocorrelations," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 244, Society for Computational Economics.
  4. J. Barkley Rosser, 2008. "Econophysics And Economic Complexity," Advances in Complex Systems (ACS), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 11(05), pages 745-760.
  5. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Lee, Jun-De, 2009. "Energy prices, multiple structural breaks, and efficient market hypothesis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 466-479, April.
  6. Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "High Frequency Trading and the New-Market Makers," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-076/2/DSF21, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Aug 2011.
  7. R. Steuer & L. Molgedey & W. Ebeling & M.A. Jiménez-Montaño, 2001. "Entropy and optimal partition for data analysis," The European Physical Journal B - Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 265-269, 01.
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Cited by:
  1. Pawe{\l} Fiedor, 2014. "Information-theoretic approach to lead-lag effect on financial markets," Papers 1402.3820, arXiv.org.

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