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Energy efficiency, innovation, and job creation in California

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  • Roland-Holst, David W.

    ()
    (University of California, Berkeley. Dept of agricultural and resource economics)

Abstract

Global climate change poses significant risks to the California economy. Recognizing and responding to these threats, Governor Schwarzenegger signed Executive Order #S-3-05 (Schwarzenegger 2005) which called for a 30 percent reduction below business-as-usual of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. In September 2006, the California legislature passed and Governor Schwarzenegger signed into law the historic Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32), which mandates a first-in-the-nation limit on emissions that cause global warming. In June 2006, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) released a “Draft Scoping Plan†– the policy roadmap to meet the emissions reduction target of 169 Million Metric Tons of Carbon (MMTCO2) equivalent by 2020 to stabilize at 427 MMTCO2 overall. The CARB board will take up final adoption of this plan in December 2008. During the months leading up to this decision, a financial crisis of global proportions is unfolding. The state, nation and world are caught in serial market failures sparked by the collapse of the housing credit market, and there is much speculation about the impact of declining capital gains revenue on the state budget. Against this backdrop, Energy Efficiency, Innovation, and Job Creation in California analyses the economic impact of CARB’s past and future policies to reduce fossil fuel generated energy demand. California’s achievements in energy efficiency over the last generation are well known, but evidence about their deeper economic implications remains weak. This study examines the economy-wide employment effects of the state’s landmark efficiency policies over the last thirty-five years, and forecasts the economic effects of significantly more aggressive policies proposed to reduce emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy in its series CUDARE Working Paper Series with number 1069.

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Length: 82 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:are:cudare:1069

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Postal: University of California, Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics Library, 248 Giannini Hall #3310, Berkeley CA 94720-3310
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Related research

Keywords: energy sustainability; climate change; economic policy; energy policy;

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References

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  1. Laitner, Skip & Bernow, Stephen & DeCicco, John, 1998. "Employment and other macroeconomic benefits of an innovation-led climate strategy for the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 425-432, April.
  2. Michael Hanemann, 2008. "California's New Greenhouse Gas Laws," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(1), pages 114-129, Winter.
  3. Palmer, Karen & Newell, Richard & Gillingham, Kenneth, 2004. "Retrospective Examination of Demand-side Energy-efficiency Policies," Discussion Papers dp-04-19, Resources For the Future.
  4. McManus, Walter, 2006. "Can proactive fuel economy strategies help automakers mitigate fuel price risk?," MPRA Paper 3460, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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Cited by:
  1. Liverani, Andrea, 2009. "Climate change and individual behavior : considerations for policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5058, The World Bank.
  2. Trevor Houser & Shashank Mohan & Robert Heilmayr, 2009. "A Green Recovery? Assessing US Economic Stimulus and the Prospects for International Coordination," Policy Briefs PB09-3, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  3. Arik Levinson, 2013. "California Energy Efficiency: Lessons for the Rest of the World, or Not?," NBER Working Papers 19123, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Simon Dietz & David Maddison, 2009. "New Frontiers in the Economics of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 295-306, July.

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