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Correcting for Survival Effects in Cross Section Wage Equations Using NBA Data

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  • Peter A. Groothuis
  • James Richard Hill

Abstract

Cross sectional employment data is not random. Individuals who survive to a longer level of tenure tend to have a higher level of productivity than those who exit earlier. This result suggests that in cross sectional data high productivity workers are over-sampled at high levels of tenure. In wage equations using cross sectional data, results could be biased from the over sampling of high productive workers at long levels of tenure. This survival effect in cross sectional data could possibly bias the coefficient on tenure upwards. We explore techniques to correct for survival bias using a panel study of National Basketball Association players. In particular we focus on a modified Heckman selectivity bias procedure using duration models to correct for survival bias. Key Words:

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File URL: http://econ.appstate.edu/RePEc/pdf/wp0919.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Appalachian State University in its series Working Papers with number 09-19.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:apl:wpaper:09-19

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Fax: 828-262-6105
Web page: http://www.business.appstate.edu/departments/economics/
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  1. Abraham, Katharine G & Farber, Henry S, 1987. "Job Duration, Seniority, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 278-97, June.
  2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  3. Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black & Frank A. Scott, 2004. "Is There Job Lock? Evidence from the Pre-HIPAA Era," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 953-976, April.
  4. Peter A. Groothuis & Richard Hill, 2007. "Exit Discrimination in Major League Baseball: 1990-2004," Working Papers 07-02, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  5. Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1998. "The Duration Of Medicaid Spells: An Analysis Using Flow And Stock Samples," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 667-675, November.
  6. Lazear, Edward P, 1979. "Why Is There Mandatory Retirement?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1261-84, December.
  7. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  8. Peter A. Groothuis & Jana D. Groothuis, 2006. "Nepotism or Family Tradition?: A Study of NASCAR Drivers," Working Papers 06-11, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  9. Peter A. Groothuis & J. Richard Hill, 2004. "Exit Discrimination in the NBA: A Duration Analysis of Career Length," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(2), pages 341-349, April.
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