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Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Ethiopia

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  • Rashid, Shahidur
  • Assefa, Meron
  • Ayele, Gezahegne

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/48519
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Bank in its series Agricultural Distortions Working Paper with number 48519.

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Date of creation: Dec 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ags:wbadwp:48519

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Web page: http://www.worldbank.org
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Related research

Keywords: Distorted incentives; agricultural and trade policy reforms; national agricultural development; Agricultural and Food Policy; International Relations/Trade; F13; F14; Q17; Q18;

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References

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  1. Franzel, Steven & Colburn, Forrest & Degu, Getahun, 1989. "Grain marketing regulations : Impact on peasant production in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 347-358, November.
  2. Stefan Dercon & Lulseged Ayalew, 1995. "Smuggling and supply response: coffee in Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 1995-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Byerlee, Derek & Spielman, David J. & Alemu, Dawit & Gautam, Madhur, 2007. "Policies to promote cereal intensification in Ethiopia: A review of evidence and experience," IFPRI discussion papers 707, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Anderson, Kym & Kurzweil, Marianne & Martin, William J. & Sandri, Damiano & Valenzuela, Ernesto, 2008. "Methodology for Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48326, World Bank.
  5. Dessalegn, Gebremeskel & Jayne, Thomas S. & Shaffer, James D., 1998. "Market Structure, Conduct, and Performance: Constraints of Performance of Ethiopian Grain Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55597, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  6. Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hoddinott, John, 2005. "Does food aid Really have disincentive effects? New evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1689-1704, October.
  7. Diao, Xinshen & Pratt, Alejandro Nin & Ghautam, Madhur & Keough, James & Chamberlin, Jordan & You, Liangszi & Puetz, Detlev & Resnick, Danielle & Yu, Bingxin, 2005. "Growth options and poverty reduction in Ethiopia," DSGD discussion papers 20, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. repec:fth:oxesaf:95-5 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Anderson, Kym & Masters, William A., 2008. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Sub-Saharan and North Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48572, World Bank.
  2. Anderson, Kym & Masters, William A., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48554, World Bank.
  3. Ketema, Mengistu & Bauer, Siegfried, 0. "Determinants of Manure and Fertilizer Applications in Eastern Highlands of Ethiopia," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universit├Ąt zu Berlin, vol. 50.
  4. Robinson, Sherman & Willenbockel, Dirk & Ahmed, Hashim & Dorosh, Paul, 2010. "Implications of food production and price shocks for household welfare in Ethiopia: a general equilibrium analysis," MPRA Paper 39533, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Valenzuela, Ernesto & Kurzweil, Marianne & Croser, Johanna L. & Nelgen, Signe & Anderson, Kym, 2007. "Annual Estimates Of African Distortions To Agricultural Incentives," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48553, World Bank.
  6. Spielman, David J. & Byerlee, Derek & Alemu, Dawit & Kelemework, Dawit, 2010. "Policies to promote cereal intensification in Ethiopia: The search for appropriate public and private roles," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 185-194, June.
  7. Ketema, Mengistu & Bauer, Siegfried, 2012. "Factors Affecting Intercropping and Conservation Tillage Practices in Eastern Ethiopia," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 4(1), March.

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