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Determinants of farmer adoption of organic production methods in the fresh-market produce sector in California: A logistic regression analysis

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  • Anderson, Jamie B.
  • Jolly, Desmond A.
  • Green, Richard D.
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    Abstract

    This research uses binomial and multinomial logistic regression models to identify the factors that influence farmers’ adoption of organic technology. Using a sample of 175 farmers growing fresh-market produce in three California counties, the first model examines farmers’ choice between conventional-only and organic-only production. The second model compares conventional-only and "dual-method" (combined conventional and organic) production, while the third model employs all three choices in a multinomial model. These results, which indicate that gross sales, direct marketing, number of crops and acres, farmer age, and computer usage are significant determinants, have implications on policies that regulate the organic foods sector.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/36319
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2005 Annual Meeting, July 6-8, 2005, San Francisco, California with number 36319.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:waeasa:36319

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    Web page: http://waeaonline.org/
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    Keywords: Production Economics;

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    1. Dimitri, Carolyn & Greene, Catherine R., 2002. "Recent Growth Patterns In The U.S. Organic Foods Market," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33715, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. D'Souza, Gerard E. & Cyphers, Douglas & Phipps, Tim T., 1993. "Factors Affecting The Adoption Of Sustainable Agricultural Practices," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 22(2), October.
    3. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 1999. "Analysis of the Determinants of Adoption of Organic Horticultural Techniques in the UK," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 47-63.
    4. Pagan, A. R. & Nicholls, D. F., 1984. "Estimating predictions, prediction errors and their standard deviations using constructed variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 293-310, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mzoughi, Naoufel, 2011. "Farmers adoption of integrated crop protection and organic farming: Do moral and social concerns matter?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1536-1545, June.
    2. Naoufel Mzoughi, 2011. "Farmers adoption of integrated crop protection and organic farming: Do moral and social concerns matter?," Working Papers 40181, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France.

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