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Valuing Agroforestry In The Presence Of Land Degradation

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Author Info

  • Cacho, Oscar J.

Abstract

Agroforestry can help prevent land degradation while allowing continuing use of land to produce crops and livestock. A problem with the evaluation of agroforestry using long-run static models and traditional discounting techniques is that the present value of the forestry enterprise is generally much lower than that of other production activities. This problem is common with Australian native species which tend to have a high environmental value but a low market value. This paper presents an economic analysis of an agroforestry operation in land prone to degradation and in the presence of positive externalities provided by trees. The value of the land is estimated based on the present value of expected returns in perpetuity under optimal management. Simulation analysis is used to evaluate the loss in land value caused by dryland salinity. A nonlinear programming model is developed and used to study the effects of timber prices and forest planting costs on optimal forest area and the level of salinity. Elasticities of relevant variables with respect to prices and costs are derived and policy implications of results are discussed.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/12931
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of New England, School of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 12931.

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Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uneewp:12931

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Related research

Keywords: agroforestry; land degradation; externalities; dryland salinity; Land Economics/Use;

References

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  1. Ehui, Simeon K. & Hertel, Thomas W. & Preckel, Paul V., 1990. "Forest resource depletion, soil dynamics, and agricultural productivity in the tropics," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 136-154, March.
  2. Deacon Robert T., 1995. "Assessing the Relationship between Government Policy and Deforestation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 1-18, January.
  3. McConnell, Kenneth E., 1989. "The Optimal Quantity Of Land In Agriculture," Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 18(2), October.
  4. Paul M. Comolli, 1981. "Principles and Policy in Forestry Economics," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(1), pages 300-309, Spring.
  5. Samuelson, Paul A, 1976. "Economics of Forestry in an Evolving Society," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(4), pages 466-92, December.
  6. Hartman, Richard, 1976. "The Harvesting Decision When a Standing Forest Has Value," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(1), pages 52-58, March.
  7. Swallow, Stephen K. & Parks, Peter J. & Wear, David N., 1990. "Policy-relevant nonconvexities in the production of multiple forest benefits," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 264-280, November.
  8. Englin, Jeffrey E. & Klan, Mark S., 1990. "Optimal taxation: Timber and externalities," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 263-275, May.
  9. Edward B. Barbier, 1990. "The Farm-Level Economics of Soil Conservation: The Uplands of Java," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(2), pages 199-211.
  10. Barrett, Scott, 1991. "Optimal soil conservation and the reform of agricultural pricing policies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 167-187, October.
  11. Renan U. Goetz, 1997. "Diversification in Agricultural Production: A Dynamic Model of Optimal Cropping to Manage Soil Erosion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(2), pages 341-356.
  12. Rigoberto A. Lopez & Farhed A. Shah & Marilyn A. Altobello, 1994. "Amenity Benefits and the Optimal Allocation of Land," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(1), pages 53-62.
  13. Edward B. Barbier & Joanne C. Burgess, 1997. "The Economics of Tropical Forest Land Use Options," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(2), pages 174-195.
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Cited by:
  1. Hean, Robyn L. & Cacho, Oscar J. & Signor, Anthony & Mullen, John D., 2000. "The Potential Role of Farm Forestry in the Wheat-Sheep Zone of NSW," 2000 Conference (44th), January 23-25, 2000, Sydney, Australia 123659, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

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