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Psychology, Gender, and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets

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  • Hoffmann, Vivian

Abstract

This paper reports results from a field experiment in Uganda. The proportion of children five years and younger who slept under a mosquito net was 20 percent higher when nets were distributed for free compared to when an equivalent cash transfer could be used to purchase nets. This effect is attributable to the endowment effect (more nets were retained when received for free than offered for sale), and to differences in how purchased and free nets are allocated within the household. Nets received for free were more likely to be used by young children. Purchased nets, on the other hand, were used by those members of the household, often adults, perceived by participants to suffer from malaria most frequently. When a married woman acquired nets, the probability that her children used these increased with the educational attainment of her husband.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in its series Working Papers with number 55282.

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Date of creation: Sep 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:umdrwp:55282

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Related research

Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics; Health Economics and Policy; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; International Development;

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  1. Arkes, Hal R. & Blumer, Catherine, 1985. "The psychology of sunk cost," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 124-140, February.
  2. John Hoddinott & Lawrence Haddad, 1994. "Does female income share influence household expenditures? Evidence from the Côte d'Ivoire," CSAE Working Paper Series 1994-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. Phipps, S.A. & Burton, P.S., 1992. "What's Mine is Yours?: The Influence of Male and Female Incomes on Patterns of Household Expenditure," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 92-12, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  4. Nava Ashraf & James Berry & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2010. "Can Higher Prices Stimulate Product Use? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Zambia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2383-2413, December.
  5. Peter Brooks & Horst Zank, 2005. "Loss Averse Behavior," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 301-325, December.
  6. Cropper, Maureen L. & Haile, Mitiku & Lampietti, Julian & Poulos, Christine & Whittington, Dale, 2004. "The demand for a malaria vaccine: evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 303-318, October.
  7. Bourguignon, F. & Browning, M. & Chiappori, P.A. & Lechene, V., 1992. "Intra Household Allocation of Consumption : A Model and Some Evidence from French Data," DELTA Working Papers 92-08, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  8. Anderson, T W & Kunitomo, Naoto & Sawa, Takamitsu, 1982. "Evaluation of the Distribution Function of the Limited Information Maximum Likelihood Estimator," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1009-27, July.
  9. Peter Kooreman, 2000. "The Labeling Effect of a Child Benefit System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 571-583, June.
  10. Tversky, Amos & Kahneman, Daniel, 1991. "Loss Aversion in Riskless Choice: A Reference-Dependent Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(4), pages 1039-61, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Brian Blackburn & Aprajit Mahajan & Alessandro Tarozzi & Joanne Yoong, 2009. "Bednets, Information and Malaria in Orissa," Discussion Papers 08-025, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  2. Vivian Hoffmann, 2009. "Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 236-41, May.

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