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Demand For Food Quantity And Quality In China

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Author Info

  • Gale, H. Frederick, Jr.
  • Huang, Kuo S.

Abstract

As their incomes rise, Chinese consumers are changing their diets and demanding greater quality, convenience, and safety in food. Food expenditures grow faster than quantities purchased as income rises, suggesting that consumers with higher incomes purchase more expensive foods. The top-earning Chinese households appear to have reached a point where the income elasticity of demand for quantity of most foods is near zero. China’s food market is becoming segmented. The demand for quality by high-income households has fueled recent growth in modern food retail and sales of premium-priced food and beverage products. Food expenditures and incomes have grown much more slowly for rural and low-income urban households.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Economic Research Report with number 7252.

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Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:7252

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Related research

Keywords: China; food; consumption; demand; income; elasticities; Engel curve; households; rural; urban; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Frank Fuller & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(1), pages 101-119, 03.
  2. Calvin, Linda & Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Hu, Dinghuan & Lohmar, Bryan, 2006. "Food Safety Improvements Underway in China," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, November.
  3. Gale, H. Frederick, Jr., 2006. "Food Expenditures by China's High-Income Households," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(01), March.
  4. Veeck, Ann & Burns, Alvin C., 2005. "Changing tastes: the adoption of new food choices in post-reform China," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 644-652, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Tey, (John) Yeong-Sheng & Mohamed Arshad, Fatimah & Shamsudin, Mad Nasir & Mohamed, Zainalabidin & Radam, Alias, 2008. "Demand for meat quantitu and quality in Malaysia: Implications to Australia," MPRA Paper 15032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Tao Xiang & Jikun Huang & d’Artis Kancs & Scott Rozelle & Jo Swinnen, 2012. "Food Standards and Welfare: General Equilibrium Effects," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 223-244, 06.
  3. Liu, Haiyan & Wahl, Thomas I. & Seale, James L., Jr. & Bai, Junfei, 2012. "Household Composition and Food Away From Home Expenditures in Urban China," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 131057, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Tian, Xu & Yu, Xiaohua & Holst, Rainer, 2011. "Applying the payment card approach to estimate the WTP for green food in China," IAMO Forum 2011: Will the "BRICs Decade" Continue? – Prospects for Trade and Growth 23, Leib­niz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO).
  5. Kaplinsky, Raphael & Terheggen, Anne & Tijaja, Julia, 2011. "China as a Final Market: The Gabon Timber and Thai Cassava Value Chains," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1177-1190, July.
  6. Waldron, Scott A. & Brown, Colin G. & Longworth, John W., 2009. "China’s Agricultural Modernisation Program: an assessment of its sustainability and impacts in the case of the high-value beef chain," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 50784, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  7. Almås, Ingvild & Johnsen, Åshild Auglænd, 2012. "The cost of living in China: Implications for inequality and poverty," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 21/2012, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics.
  8. Waldron, Scott & Brown, Colin & Longworth, John, 2010. "A critique of high-value supply chains as a means of modernising agriculture in China: The case of the beef industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 479-487, October.
  9. Phil Briggs & Carly Harker & Tim Ng & Aidan Yao, 2011. "Fluctuations in the international prices of oil, dairy products, beef and lamb between 2000 and 2008: A review of market-specific demand and supply factors," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2011/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  10. Junfei Bai & Caiping Zhang & Fangbin Qiao & Tom Wahl, 2012. "Disaggregating household expenditures on food away from home in Beijing by type of food facility and type of meal," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 18-35, February.
  11. Emi Nakamura & Jón Steinsson & Miao Liu, 2014. "Are Chinese Growth and Inflation Too Smooth? Evidence from Engel Curves," NBER Working Papers 19893, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Meng, Ting & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Ibrahim, Mohammed, 2012. "Food Expenditures and Income in Rural Households in the Northern Region of Ghana," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124638, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  13. Liu, Haiyan & Wahl, Thomas I. & Bai, Junfei & Seale, James L., Jr., 2012. "Understanding food-away-from-home expenditures in urban China," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124662, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  14. Wang, Zhigang & Mao, Yanna & Gale, Fred, 2008. "Chinese consumer demand for food safety attributes in milk products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 27-36, February.
  15. Bai, Junfei & Wahl, Thomas I. & Lohmar, Bryan T. & Huang, Jikun, 2010. "Food away from home in Beijing: Effects of wealth, time and "free" meals," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 432-441, September.
  16. Kang Ernest Liu & Hung-Hao Chang & Wen S. Chern, 2011. "Examining changes in fresh fruit and vegetable consumption over time and across regions in urban China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 276-296, September.

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