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Farm Household Well-Being: Comparing Consumption- and Income-Based Measures

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  • Jones, Carol Adaire
  • Milkove, Daniel
  • Paszkiewicz, Laura
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    Abstract

    Household economic well-being can be gauged by the financial resources (income/ wealth) available to the household or by the standard of living enjoyed by household members (consumption). Based on responses to USDA’s annual Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), a joint effort by the Economic Research Service (ERS) and the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, ERS has long published estimates of farm household income and wealth. This report presents, for the first time, estimates of consumption-based measures of well-being for farm households based on new questions in ARMS. The consumption measure provides a different perspective from income or wealth on farm households’ well-being relative to that of all U.S. households.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Economic Research Report with number 58299.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:58299

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    Related research

    Keywords: household consumption; household income; household well-being measures; farm households; self-employed households; permanent income; permanent income hypothesis.; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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    1. Burkhauser, Richard V. & Feng, Shuaizhang & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Larrimore, Jeff, 2008. "Estimating Trends in US Income Inequality Using the Current Population Survey: The Importance of Controlling for Censoring," IZA Discussion Papers 3690, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Bruce D. Meyer & James X. Sullivan, 2009. "Five Decades of Consumption and Income Poverty," Working Papers 0907, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    3. Michael D. Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2006. "Economic Well-Being at Older Ages: Income- and Consumption-Based Poverty Measures in the HRS," NBER Working Papers 12680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater, 2006. "A Simple Test of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(289), pages 27-46, 02.
    5. Christopher D. Carroll & Miles S. Kimball, 2006. "Precautionary Saving and Precautionary Wealth," Economics Working Paper Archive 530, The Johns Hopkins University,Department of Economics.
    6. Christopher D. Carroll, 2001. "A Theory of the Consumption Function, With and Without Liquidity Constraints (Expanded Version)," NBER Working Papers 8387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Fisher Jonathan D & Johnson David S, 2006. "Consumption Mobility in the United States: Evidence from Two Panel Data Sets," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-38, September.
    8. Whitaker, James B. & Effland, Anne, 2009. "Income Stabilization Through Government Payments: How Is Farm Household Consumption Affected?," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 38(1), April.
    9. David S. Johnson & Stephanie Shipp, 1999. "note: Inequality and the business cycle: A consumption viewpoint," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 173-180.
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    Cited by:
    1. Jeffrey Thompson & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Recent Trends in the Distribution of Income: Labor, Wealth and More Complete Measures of Well Being," Working Papers wp225, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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