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Decoupled Payments: Household Income Transfers In Contemporary U.S. Agriculture

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  • Anonymous
  • Hopkins, Jeffrey W.
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    Abstract

    Decoupled payments are lump-sum income transfers to farm operators that do not depend on current production, factor use, or commodity prices. Such payments are not currently constrained by global trade rules, but many countries argue that they distort production and trade and that their use should be limited. This report examines the U.S. experience with decoupled payments in its Production Flexibility Contracts program under the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform (FAIR) Act of 1996. The payments have improved the well-being of recipient farm households, enabling them to comfortably increase spending, savings, investments, and leisure but with minimal distortion of U.S. agricultural production and trade. However, farm operators may retain as little as 40 percent of program benefits due to higher land rents. While commercial farms received the largest share of decoupled payments, they rent in over two-thirds of their program acres, which suggests that a sizable portion of their program benefits may be passed through to nonfarming landowners.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Agricultural Economics Reports with number 34057.

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    Date of creation: 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34057

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    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics;

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    Cited by:
    1. Happe, Kathrin & Balmann, Alfons & Kellermann, Konrad & Sahrbacher, Christoph, 2008. "Does structure matter? The impact of switching the agricultural policy regime on farm structures," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 431-444, August.
    2. Daniel May, 2011. "Agricultural trade liberalization under bilateralism: an international network perspective," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 23-34, April.
    3. Whitaker, James B. & Effland, Anne, 2009. "Income Stabilization Through Government Payments: How Is Farm Household Consumption Affected?," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 38(1), April.
    4. Vyn, Richard J. & Haq, Zahoor Ul & Weerahewa, Jeevika & Meilke, Karl D., 2012. "The Influence of Market Returns and Government Payments on Canadian Farmland Values," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 37(2), August.
    5. Donnellan, Trevor & Hennessy, Thia, 2012. "Defining a theoretical model of farm households’ labour allocation decisions," Factor Markets Working Papers 140, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    6. D’Antoni, Jeremy M. & Mishra, Ashok K. & Barkley, Andrew P., 2012. "Feast or flee: Government payments and labor migration from U.S. agriculture," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 181-192.
    7. Ciaian, Pavel & Kancs, d'Artis & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2012. "European Union Land Markets and the Common Agricultural Policy," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126683, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Pavel Ciaian & d'Artis Kancs & Johan F.M. Swinnen, 2008. "Static and Dynamic Distributional Effects of Decoupled Payments: Single Farm Payments in the European Union," LICOS Discussion Papers 20708, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    9. Yang Zou & Qingbin Wang, 2012. "Impacts of direct government payments on US agriculture: evidence from 1960-2010 data," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(2), pages 188-199, May.
    10. D'Antoni, Jeremy M. & Mishra, Ashok K. & Joo, Hyunjeong, 2012. "Welfare Implications of a Reduction in Government Payments: The Role of Fringe Benefits," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124766, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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