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The Impact Of Bse On Japanese Retail Beef Market

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  • Peterson, Hikaru Hanawa
  • Chen, Yun-Ju (Kelly)

Abstract

To assess the impact of BSE in Japan, a Japanese meat demand system is estimated as a gradual switching Rotterdam model. The results, based on data from April 1994 to May 2002, suggest the structural transition took five months from its discovery. The scare affected both domestic and imported beef.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/35233
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2003 Annual Meeting, February 1-5, 2003, Mobile, Alabama with number 35233.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ags:saeatm:35233

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Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Hayes, Dermot J. & Wahl, Thomas I. & Williams, Gary W., 1990. "Testing Restrictions on a Model of Japanese Meat Demand," Staff General Research Papers 10940, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Ohtani, Kazuhiro & Katayama, Sei-ichi, 1986. "A gradual switching regression model with autocorrelated errors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 169-172.
  3. Xu, Xiaosong & Veeman, Michele, 1996. "Model Choice and Structural Specification for Canadian Meat Consumption," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 301-15.
  4. Comeau, Allison & Mittelhammer, Ronald C. & Wahl, Thomas I., 1997. "Assessing The Effectiveness Of Mpp And Tea Advertising And Promotion Efforts In The Japanese Market For Meats," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 28(2), July.
  5. M.-J.J. Mangen & A.M. Burrell, 2001. "Decomposing Preference Shifts for Meat and Fish in the Netherlands," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 16-28.
  6. Lloyd, Tim & McCorriston, S. & Morgan, C. W. & Rayner, A. J., 2001. "The impact of food scares on price adjustment in the UK beef market," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 347-357, September.
  7. Aaron J. Johnson & Catherine A. Durham & Cathy R. Wessells, 1998. "Seasonality in Japanese household demand for meat and seafood," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 337-351.
  8. Capps, Oral, Jr. & Tsai, Reyfong & Kirby, Raymond & Williams, Gary W., 1994. "A Comparison Of Demands For Meat Products In The Pacific Rim Region," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  9. Eales, James S. & Roheim, Cathy A., 1999. "Testing Separability Of Japanese Demand For Meat And Fish Within Differential Demand Systems," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 24(01), July.
  10. Moschini, GianCarlo & Meilke, Karl D., 1989. "Modeling the Pattern of Structural Change in U.S. Meat Demand," Staff General Research Papers 11266, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Livanis, Grigorios T. & Moss, Charles B., 2005. "Price Transmission and Food Scares in the U.S. Beef Sector," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19485, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  2. Yeboah, Osei-Agyeman & Ofori-Boadu, Victor & Salifou, Samaila, 2009. "A Foot and Mouth Disease Induced Model of US Excess Supply of Beef," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46053, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  3. Pritchett, James G. & Thilmany, Dawn D. & Johnson, Kamina K., 2005. "Animal Disease Economic Impacts: A Survey of Literature and Typology of Research Approaches," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 8(01).
  4. Jin, Hyun Joung & Skripnitchenko, Anatoliy & Koo, Won W., 2004. "The Effects Of The Bse Outbreak In The United States On The Beef And Cattle Industry," Special Reports 23072, North Dakota State University, Center for Agricultural Policy and Trade Studies.
  5. Peng, Yanning & McCann-Hiltz, Diane & Goddard, Ellen W., 2004. "Consumer Demand For Meat In Alberta, Canada: Impact Of Bse," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20331, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  6. Yeboah, Godfred & Maynard, Leigh J., 2004. "The Impact Of Bse, Fmd, And U.S. Export Promotion Expenditures On Japanese Meat Demand," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19978, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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