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Income Convergence and Growth in Alabama: Evidence from Sub-county Level Data

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  • Gyawali, Buddhi Raj
  • Fraser, Rory
  • Banerjee, Ban
  • Bukenya, James O.
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    Abstract

    1980 and 2000 Census Block Group (CBG) data were used to examine income convergence in all Alabama counties vis-à-vis Alabama’s Black Belt and Northwest regions. Though all three models demonstrated conditional income convergence, CBGs with smaller initial populations, smaller changes in African-American or dependent age populations had higher income changes.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia with number 46713.

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    Date of creation: 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:saeana:46713

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    Related research

    Keywords: Alabama; African-Americans; Black Belt; Census Block Groups; Income Convergence; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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