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Using Informational Labeling To Influence The Market For Quality In Food Products

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Author Info

  • Caswell, Julie A.
  • Mojduszka, Eliza M.

Abstract

In the United States, the federal government is increasingly using requirements for informational labeling on food products to influence 1) consumers' knowledge and purchasing patterns and 2) manufacturers' product offerings and marketing practices. We discuss the economic rationale behind these regulations and issues related to judging their success or failure.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance in its series Working Papers with number 25989.

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Date of creation: 1996
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Handle: RePEc:ags:rpspwp:25989

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Postal: Draper Hall, College of Food and Natural Resources, Amherst, MA 01003
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Web page: http://www.umass.edu/ne165/
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Related research

Keywords: Food labeling; food quality; food safety; information; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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References

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  1. Hooker, Neal H. & Caswell, Julie A., 1995. "Regulatory Targets And Regimes For Food Safety: A Comparison Of North American And European Approaches," Proceedings: The Economics of Reducing Health Risk from Food, June 6-7, 1995, Washington, D.C. 25964, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
  2. Alan Swinbank, 1993. "Completion of the EC's internal market, mutual recognition, and the food industries," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(5), pages 509-522.
  3. Kyle Bagwell & Michael Riordan, 1986. "Equilibrium Price Dynamics for an Experience Good," Discussion Papers 705, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  4. Henson, Spencer & Traill, Bruce, 1993. "The demand for food safety : Market imperfections and the role of government," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 152-162, April.
  5. Wesley A. Magat & W. Kip Viscusi, 1992. "Informational Approaches to Regulation," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026213277x, December.
  6. Klein, Benjamin & Leffler, Keith B, 1981. "The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(4), pages 615-41, August.
  7. Darby, Michael R & Karni, Edi, 1973. "Free Competition and the Optimal Amount of Fraud," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 67-88, April.
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