Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

An Economic Analysis of Quarantine: The Economies of Australia's Ban on New Zealand Apple Imports

Contents:

Author Info

  • Arthur, Matthew
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The quarantine policy decision-making process in Australia is subject to the principles of the World Trade Organisation's SPS Agreement. It is primarily based on the risks and associated economic costs accruing to producers in the event of disease entry. The costs of a quarantine measure in terms of forgone trade benefits are not considered. The impact associated with this asymmetric approach is identified by demonstrating the gains to consumers which may arise through liberalised markets using a case study of the Australian apple industry. A partial equilibrium analysis is used to show the impacts of apple market liberalisation, which can be expected to yield gains to consumers which are greater than the economic costs to on producers.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31959
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2006 Conference, August 24-25, 2006, Nelson, New Zealand with number 31959.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:nzar06:31959

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.nzares.org.nz/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Quarantine; trade; liberalisation; apples; welfare; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; International Relations/Trade;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. John C. Beghin & Jean-Christophe Bureau, 2001. "Quantification of Sanitary, Phytosanitary, and Technical Barriers to Trade for Trade Policy Analysis," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 01-wp291, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    2. Roberts, Donna & Josling, Timothy E. & Orden, David, 1999. "A Framework for Analyzing Technical Trade Barriers in Agricultural Markets," Technical Bulletins 33560, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Anderson, Kym & James, Sarah, 1998. "On the Need for More Economic Assessment of Quarantine/SPS Policies," CEPR Discussion Papers 1934, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:nzar06:31959. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.