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Evaluating Measures To Improve Agricultural Input Use

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  • Crawford, Eric W.
  • Kelly, Valerie A.

Abstract

This paper provides guidelines to assist policymakers and analysts in (1) identifying promising public and private actions for promoting agricultural intensification by improving the availability and profitability of agricultural inputs; and (2) evaluating the relative costs and benefits of alternative actions. The guidelines are illustrated by reference to a study of phosphate fertilizer promotion in Mali originally conducted by IFDC researchers.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11686
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Staff Papers with number 11686.

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Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11686

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: (517) 355-4563
Fax: (517) 432-1800
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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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Keywords: Farm Management;

References

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  1. Barrett, Christopher B., 1997. "Food marketing liberalization and trader entry: Evidence from Madagascar," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 763-777, May.
  2. Jayne, Thomas S. & Shaffer, James D. & Staatz, John M. & Reardon, Thomas, 1997. "Improving the Impact of Market Reform on Agricultural Productivity in Africa: How Institutional Design Makes a Difference," Food Security International Development Working Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54684, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. Weight, David & Kelly, Valerie A., 1999. "Fertilizer Impacts on Soils and Crops of Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Security International Development Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54050, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mukumbu, Mulinge & Chisvo, Munhamo & Tschirley, David L. & Weber, Michael T. & Zulu, Ballard & Johansson, Robert C. & Santos, Paula Mota & Soroko, David, 1999. "Successes and Challenges of Food Market Reform: Experiences from Kenya, Mozambique, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," Food Security International Development Working Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54672, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Jayne, T S, 1994. "Do High Food Marketing Costs Constrain Cash Crop Production? Evidence from Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 387-402, January.
  6. Colin Poulton & Andrew Dorward & Jonathan Kydd, 1998. "The revival of smallholder cash crops in Africa: public and private roles in the provision of finance," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 85-103.
  7. E B Barbier & A Markandya & D W Pearce, 1990. "Environmental sustainability and cost - benefit analysis," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 22(9), pages 1259-1266, September.
  8. Govereh, Jones & Jayne, Thomas S., 1999. "Effects of Cash Crop Production on Food Crop Productivity in Zimbabwe: Synergies or Trade-offs?," Food Security International Development Working Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54670, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  9. Bumb, Balu & Baanante, Carlos A., 1996. "The role of fertilizer in sustaining food security and protecting the environment to 2020.:," 2020 vision discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Reardon, Thomas & Crawford, Eric W. & Kelly, Valerie A. & Diagana, Bocar N., 1995. "Promoting Farm Investment for Sustainable Intensification of African Agriculture," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11352, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  11. Dembele, Niama Nango & Staatz, John M., 1999. "The Impact Of Market Reform On Agricultural Transformation In Mali," Staff Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11717, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  12. Reardon, Thomas & Kelly, Valerie A. & Crawford, Eric W. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Savadogo, Kimseyinga & Clay, Daniel C., 1996. "Determinants of Farm Productivity in Africa: A Synthesis of Four Case Studies," Food Security International Development Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 54049, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  13. Kelly, Valerie A. & Reardon, Thomas & Yanggen, David & Naseem, Anwar, 1998. "Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa: Breaking the Vicious Circle of High Prices and Low Demand," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11449, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Crawford, Eric W. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Alternative Approaches for Promoting Fertilizer Use in Africa, with Particular Reference to the Role of Fertilizer Subsidies," Staff Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11557, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Xu, Zhiying & Govereh, Jones & Black, J. Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2006. "Maize Yield Response to Fertilizer and Profitability of Fertilizer Use Among Small-Scale Maize Producers in Zambia," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25730, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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