Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Government Expenditures, Social Outcomes, and Marginal Productivity of Agricultural Inputs: A Case Study for Tanzania

Contents:

Author Info

  • Allen, Summer L.
  • Badiane, Ousmane
  • Ulimwengu, John M.

Abstract

Using the most recent data from Tanzania, we investigate the impacts of district-level health and education expenditures on marginal productivities of agricultural inputs and overall production. We use a covariance structural model combined with a mixed linear model to account for the endogeneity of social outcomes and technological heterogeneity across districts. Our results confirm the significance of government social expenditures in human capital formation as measured through health and education indicators and their effects on agricultural productivity. Indeed, the marginal productivities of inputs (labor in particular) respond significantly and positively to health and education outcomes, especially considered jointly. The impacts also seem to be a function of the type of health constraint, with short-term health factors such as malaria and diarrhea impacting productivity from seeds and fertilizer while longer-term health constraints seem to have greater impacts on labor quality and land productivity. Our results also confirm the importance of considering intra-country heterogeneity as well as climate-related constraints, as the results show that annual precipitation has a signification impact on production for all specifications.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126663
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 126663.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126663

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Tanzania; health; education; precipitation; marginal productivity; social expenditures; state variable; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

Other versions of this item:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker Than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116, February.
  2. Adhvaryu, Achyuta R. & Beegle, Kathleen, 2009. "The long-run impacts of adult deaths on older household members in Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5037, The World Bank.
  3. Fulginiti, Lilyan E. & Perrin, Richard K., 1993. "Prices and Productivity in Agriculture," Staff General Research Papers 773, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  4. Derek Headey & Mohammad Alauddin & D.S. Prasada Rao, 2010. "Explaining agricultural productivity growth: an international perspective," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 1-14, 01.
  5. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Xiaobo & Rao, Neetha, 2004. "Public expenditure, growth, and poverty reduction in rural Uganda," DSGD discussion papers 4, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Dethier, Jean-Jacques & Effenberger, Alexandra, 2011. "Agriculture and development : a brief review of the literature," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5553, The World Bank.
  7. Allcott, Hunt & Lederman, Daniel & Lopez, Ramon, 2006. "Political institutions, inequality, and agricultural growth : the public expenditure connection," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3902, The World Bank.
  8. Mundlak, Yair & Larson, Don & Butzer, Ritz, 1997. "The determinants of agricultural production : a cross-country analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1827, The World Bank.
  9. Ersado, Lire & Amacher, Gregory & Alwang, Jeffrey Roger, 2003. "Productivity And Land Enhancing Technologies In Northern Ethiopia: Health, Public Investments, And Sequential Adoption," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25908, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  10. Shenggen Fan & Peter Hazell & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2000. "Government Spending, Growth and Poverty in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1038-1051.
  11. Phillips, Joseph M. & Marble, Robert P., 1986. "Farmer education and efficiency: a frontier production function approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 257-264, June.
  12. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Pauw, Karl & Thurlow, James, 2011. "Agricultural growth, poverty, and nutrition in Tanzania," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 795-804.
  14. Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G. & Dunn, Elizabeth G., 1995. "Technical Efficiency, Managerial Ability And Farmer Education In Guatemalan Corn Production: A Latent Variable Analysis," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 24(1), April.
  15. Benin, Samuel & Mogues, Tewodaj & Cudjoe, Godsway & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2009. "Public expenditures and agricultural productivity growth in Ghana," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51634, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  16. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Chiang, Catherine & Thangata, Paul & Andam, Kwaw S., 2011. "Interactions between health and farm-labor productivity:," Food policy reports 23, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  17. Matthew Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2006. "The impact of poor health on total factor productivity," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(6), pages 918-938.
  18. Fan, Shenngen & Hazell, Peter & Haque, T., 2000. "Targeting public investments by agro-ecological zone to achieve growth and poverty alleviation goals in rural India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 411-428, August.
  19. Gupta, Sanjeev & Verhoeven, Marijn & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2002. "The effectiveness of government spending on education and health care in developing and transition economies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 717-737, November.
  20. Maddison, David & Manley, Marita & Kurukulasuriya, Pradeep, 2007. "The impact of climate change on African agriculture : a ricardian approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4306, The World Bank.
  21. Badiane, Ousmane & Ulimwengu, John, 2009. "The growth-poverty convergence agenda: Optimizing social expenditures to maximize their impact on agricultural labor productivity, growth, and poverty reduction in Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 906, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  22. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2002. "Growth, inequality, and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," Research reports 125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  23. Mundlak, Yair & Butzer, Rita & Larson, Donald F., 2012. "Heterogeneous technology and panel data: The case of the agricultural production function," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 139-149.
  24. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2007. "Working Paper 91 - Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," Working Paper Series 226, African Development Bank.
  25. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2009. "Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes in Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 21(2), pages 400-433.
  26. McNamara, Paul E. & Ulimwengu, John M. & Leonard, Kenneth L., 2010. "Do health investments improve agricultural productivity?," IFPRI discussion papers 1012, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126663. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.