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Semi-subsistence Farm Households in Central and South-eastern Europe: Current State and Future Perspectives

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  • Fritzsch, Jana
  • Wegener, Stefan
  • Buchenrieder, Gertrud
  • Curtiss, Jarmila
  • Gomez y Paloma, Sergio

Abstract

The European Union (EU) introduced a special transitional semi-subsistence measure to promote the smallest agricultural producers, so-called semi-subsistence farm households (SFHs) in the enlargement process. An outlook on the future of SFHs requires comprehensive and reliable information on the phenomenon and the impact of policy measures on their development. Therefore, a survey using a standardised questionnaire was conducted in Poland (175 households), Romania (185 households), and Bulgaria (184 households) from July to September 2007. In a first step, four major types of SFHs could be identified by means of cluster analysis: (i) rural diversifiers, (ii) rural pensioners, (iii) farmers, and (iv) rural newcomers. In a second step, a multiobjective linear programming household model was designed to simulate the impact of policy measures and various household strategies on the future viability of the SFHs. Results show that the most preferable combination of strategies for rural diversifiers and rural newcomers is starting a non-farm self-employed activity and developing their farms. Farmers will advance best when they focus on developing their farms only, whereas rural pensioners will mainly remain or become unviable.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China with number 51444.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:51444

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Related research

Keywords: semi-subsistence; policy analysis; transition countries; multiobjective linear programming; Agricultural and Food Policy; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Consumer/Household Economics; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods; C61; P27; Q12;

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  1. Hans G. P. Jansen & John Pender & Amy Damon & Willem Wielemaker & Rob Schipper, 2006. "Policies for sustainable development in the hillside areas of Honduras: a quantitative livelihoods approach," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 34(2), pages 141-153, 03.
  2. Hannah Chaplin & Matthew Gorton & Sophia Davidova, 2007. "Impediments to the Diversification of Rural Economies in Central and Eastern Europe: Evidence from Small-scale Farms in Poland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 361-376.
  3. Hazell, P.B.R. & Poulton, Colin & Wiggins, Steve & Dorward, Andrew, 2007. "The future of small farms for poverty reduction and growth:," 2020 vision discussion papers 42, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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