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Potential Impacts of a Green Revolution in Africa – the Case of Ghana

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  • Breisinger, Clemens
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Thurlow, James
  • Al-Hassan, Ramatu M.

Abstract

Agricultural growth in Africa has accelerated, yet most of this growth has been driven by land expansion. Land expansion potential is reaching its limits, urging governments to shift towards a green revolution type of productivity-led growth. Given the huge public investments required, this paper aims to assess the potential impacts of a green revolution. Results from a CGE model for Ghana show that green revolution type growth is strongly pro-poor and provides substantial transfers to the rest of the economy, thus providing a powerful argument to raise public expenditure on agriculture to make a green revolution happen in Africa.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China with number 51086.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae09:51086

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Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
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Keywords: Agriculture; Green Revolution; growth; poverty; Africa; Ghana; CGE; Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development; D58; O13; O55;

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  1. Paul Winters & Alain De Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Kostas Stamoulis, 1998. "The role of agriculture in economic development: Visible and invisible surplus transfers," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 71-97.
  2. Diao, Xinshen & Hazell, Peter & Resnick, Danielle & Thurlow, James, 2006. "The role of agriculture in development: implications for Sub-Saharan Africa," DSGD discussion papers 29, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Xavier Irz & Terry Roe, 2005. "Seeds of growth? Agricultural productivity and the transitional dynamics of the Ramsey model," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 143-165, June.
  4. Diao, Xinshen & Dorosh, Paul A. & Rahman, Shaikh Mahfuzur, 2003. "Market opportunities for African agriculture," DSGD discussion papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Michael Johnson & Peter Hazell & Ashok Gulati, 2003. "The Role of Intermediate Factor Markets in Asia's Green Revolution: Lessons for Africa?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1211-1216.
  6. Paul Mosley, 2002. "The African green revolution as a pro-poor policy instrument," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 695-724.
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Cited by:
  1. Kolavalli, Shashi & Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z. & Diao, Xinshen & Alpuerto, Vida & Folledo, Renato & Slavova, Mira & Ngeleza, Guyslain K. & Asante, Felix Ankomah, 2012. "Economic transformation in Ghana: Where will the path lead?," IFPRI discussion papers 1161, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Paul Mosley, 2013. "Two Africas? Why Africa’s ‘Growth Miracle’ is barely reducing poverty," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 19113, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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