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The Influence of Market and Agricultural Policy Signals on the Level of Organic Farming

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  • Wheeler, Sarah Ann

Abstract

Over the last two decades, organic farming has been one of the few sectors of agriculture to increase exponentially across the world. This paper aims to analyse the relationship of market and agricultural policy signals on the share of organic farming, with a cross-country analysis in two key years (1990 and 2001). Evidence is provided on the importance of public organic agricultural support, organic farming research and development, the availability of marketing and sales outlets for organic produce and countries environmental regulations in positively driving the adoption of organic agriculture by farmers. There seems to be more support for the influence of agricultural policy signals than market signals.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia with number 25333.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae06:25333

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Related research

Keywords: organic farming; agricultural policy signals; market signals; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management; Marketing; Q10; Q16; Q18;

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  1. Damania, Richard & Fredriksson, Per G. & List, John A., 2003. "Trade liberalization, corruption, and environmental policy formation: theory and evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 490-512, November.
  2. Eliste, Paavo & Fredriksson, Per G., 2002. "Environmental Regulations, Transfers, and Trade: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 234-250, March.
  3. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
  4. Lohr, Luanne & Salomonsson, Lennart, 1998. "Conversion Subsidies For Organic Production: Results From Sweden And Lessons For The United States," Faculty Series 16640, University of Georgia, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  5. Burton, Michael P. & Rigby, Dan & Young, Trevor, 2003. "Modelling the adoption of organic horticultural technology in the UK using Duration Analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(1), March.
  6. Hendry, David F, 1980. "Econometrics-Alchemy or Science?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(188), pages 387-406, November.
  7. Rigby, Dan & Young, Trevor & Burton, Michael, 2001. "The development of and prospects for organic farming in the UK," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 599-613, December.
  8. Rigby, D. & Caceres, D., 2001. "Organic farming and the sustainability of agricultural systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 21-40, April.
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