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Food involvement and food purchasing behaviour

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  • Drichoutis, Andreas C.
  • Lazaridis, Panagiotis
  • Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.

Abstract

This paper investigates the factors affecting product class involvement for food. Factors affecting specific aspects of involvement are also explored. The aim is to determine the factors that affect involvement with food and sketch the profile of consumers more likely to be involved or not involved with food. Building on the literature a conceptual model is developed and empirically tested using survey data collected from supermarkets in Athens. Data were analyzed using probit and ordered probit analysis and marginal effects were calculated which show how much the level of involvement or importance is affected when a variable is changed. Results show that younger consumers, those with higher education and income that engage in nutritional label use behaviour and do not prepare food for their household are more likely to have low involvement with food. Less distinctive characteristics are apparent for the highly involved consumers. Different consumer profiles are also associated with different aspects of food involvement based on importance attached to price, ease of preparation, nutrition, taste, and brand name.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10048
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 98th Seminar, June 29-July 2, 2006, Chania, Crete, Greece with number 10048.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae98:10048

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Related research

Keywords: product class involvement; food involvement; consumer behaviour; food shopping; attribute importance; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

References

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  1. Caswell, Julie A. & Mojduszka, Eliza M., 1996. "Using Informational Labeling To Influence The Market For Quality In Food Products," Working Papers 25989, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
  2. Beatty, Sharon E & Smith, Scott M, 1987. " External Search Effort: An Investigation across Several Product Categories," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(1), pages 83-95, June.
  3. Lichtenstein, Donald R & Bloch, Peter H & Black, William C, 1988. " Correlates of Price Acceptability," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 243-52, September.
  4. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
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  6. Blaylock, James & Smallwood, David & Kassel, Kathleen & Variyam, Jay & Aldrich, Lorna, 1999. "Economics, food choices, and nutrition," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2-3), pages 269-286, May.
  7. Drichoutis, Andreas C. & Lazaridis, Panagiotis, 2008. "What Influences Tastes? An Analysis of the Determinants of Consumers’ Demand for Tastes in Food," Agricultural Economics Review, Greek Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(1), January.
  8. Pingsun Leung & Walter Miklius, 1997. "Demand for nutrition vs. demand for tastes," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(5), pages 291-295.
  9. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
  10. Andreas C. Drichoutis & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2005. "Nutrition knowledge and consumer use of nutritional food labels," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 93-118, March.
  11. Celsi, Richard L & Olson, Jerry C, 1988. " The Role of Involvement in Attention and Comprehension Processes," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(2), pages 210-24, September.
  12. Silberberg, Eugene, 1985. "Nutrition and the Demand for Tastes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 881-900, October.
  13. Moorthy, Sridhar & Ratchford, Brian T & Talukdar, Debabrata, 1997. " Consumer Information Search Revisited: Theory and Empirical Analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(4), pages 263-77, March.
  14. Bloch, Peter H & Sherrell, Daniel L & Ridgway, Nancy M, 1986. " Consumer Search: An Extended Framework," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 119-26, June.
  15. Darby, Michael R & Karni, Edi, 1973. "Free Competition and the Optimal Amount of Fraud," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 67-88, April.
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