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Do They Always Say No? German Consumers and Second-Generation GMO Foods

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  • Hartl, Jochen
  • Herrmann, Roland

Abstract

European consumers and, in particular, German consumers are known to be very critical towards the introduction of genetically modified (GM) foods. It is analyzed here whether German consumers do reject second-generation GMO foods, too. Whereas first-generation GM crops induced producer-related benefits, second-generation GM crops are associated with consumer-oriented benefits like an improvement of nutritional quality. The determinants of demand for second-generation GM rapeseed oil are investigated within an online survey of 1556 German consumers. It is elaborated how two functional properties of that product matter; i.e. long-chain ϖ3 fatty acids and the cholesterol-lowering effect of phytosterols. It turns out that GMO rapeseed oil is neglected by 74 % of all respondents. Output traits, however, will increase the probability of purchases of GMO rapeseed oil. This is more the case for long-chain ϖ3 fatty acids than for phytosterols.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium with number 44164.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:44164

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Related research

Keywords: consumer behavior; second generation; GMO foods; rapeseed oil; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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  1. Noussair, C. & Robin, S. & Ruffieux, B., 2001. "Do Consumers Not Care about Biotech Foods or Do They Just Not Read the Labels?," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1142, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  2. Louviere,Jordan J. & Hensher,David A. & Swait,Joffre D. With contributions by-Name:Adamowicz,Wiktor, 2000. "Stated Choice Methods," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521788304, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Livingston, Michael & Mitchell, Lorraine & Wechsler, Seth, 2014. "Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States," Economic Research Report 164263, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Allender, William J. & Richards, Timothy J. & Fang, Di & Doyon, Maurice, 2011. "Media Advertising and Ballot Initiatives: An Experimental Analysis," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 104224, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  3. Richards, Timothy J. & Allender, William J. & Fang, Di, 2011. "Media Advertising and Ballot Initiatives: An Experimental Analysis," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114814, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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