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The Influence of Communication Frequency with Social Network Actors on the Continuous Innovation Adoption: Organic Farmers in Germany

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  • Unay Gailhard, Ilkay
  • Bavorova, Miroslava
  • Pirscher, Frauke

Abstract

This study investigates previously experienced farmers’ adoption behavior of Agri-Environmental Measures (AEM) in Central Germany. We consider organic farmers as previously experienced with AEM as they already have practiced the environmental management standards for organic farming. The logit model is used to explain the influence of communication frequency on the probability of adoption of other environmental measures as a continuous innovation. Social network analysis is carried out to investigate the role of attitudes towards information sources. Our findings demonstrate the influence of communication frequency with interpersonal network actors (agricultural organizations and neighborhood farmers) on continuous innovation adoption in three ways: First, the communication frequency of organic farmers with both agricultural organizations and neighborhood farmers does not influence the original farmer’s decision to adopt AEM. Second, a higher education level of frequently communicated neighborhood farmers increases the probability of farmers’ AEM adoption, while the innovativeness of frequently communicated farmers does not. Third, inside the population of frequently communicated organic farmers, formal information sources (agricultural organizations) are considered as more important information sources about agricultural issues than are informal sources (other farmers).

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 131st Seminar, September 18-19, 2012, Prague, Czech Republic with number 135786.

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Date of creation: 18 Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa131:135786

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Keywords: Interpersonal communication network; communication frequency; innovation adoption; agri-environmental measures; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy;

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  3. Oriana Bandiera & Imran Rasul, 2002. "Social networks and technology adoption in Northern Mozambique," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3539, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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  11. Virgile Chassagnon & Marilyne Audran, 2011. "The Impact Of Interpersonal Networks On The Innovativeness Of Inventors: From Theory To Empirical Evidence," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(05), pages 931-958.
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  14. Konstantinos Chatzimichael & Margarita Genius & Vangelis Tzouvelekas, 2011. "Informational Cascades and Technology Adoption: Evidence from Greek and German Organic Growers," Working Papers 1102, University of Crete, Department of Economics, revised 12 Mar 2013.
  15. F. Bonnieux & P. Rainelli & D. Vermersch, 1998. "Estimating the Supply of Environmental Benefits by Agriculture: A French Case Study," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(2), pages 135-153, March.
  16. Volker Beckmann & Jorg Eggers & Evy Mettepenningen, 2009. "Deciding how to decide on agri-environmental schemes: the political economy of subsidiarity, decentralisation and participation in the European Union," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(5), pages 689-716.
  17. Isabel Vanslembrouck & Guido Huylenbroeck & Wim Verbeke, 2002. "Determinants of the Willingness of Belgian Farmers to Participate in Agri-environmental Measures," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 489-511.
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