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Detecting Market Power Along Food Supply Chains: Evidence From the Fluid Milk Sector in Italy

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  • Cavicchioli, Daniele

Abstract

This paper applies to Italian milk supply chain a theoretically grounded methodology able to detect for the presence of market power along the supply chain itself using easily available data. The model, developed by Lloyd et al. brings to estimate a quasi-reduced form equation in which consumer price is regressed against producer price, marketing costs and demand and supply shifters. When market power is exerted along the supply chain both of the shifters are statistically significant and signed accordingly to model prescriptions, while with perfect competition none of the shifters is significant. 29 time series have been used in the analysis, within three different dataset covering partially or totally overlapped time periods. Variables having the same order of integration have been used within an Error Correction Model framework. Among all the variables having one cointegrating vector, only those with statistically significant parameters and signed according to model prescriptions have brought to conclusive results, detecting market power exertion along the Italian milk supply chain during two over the three periods examined. The present methodology may be useful in competition policy analysis as a preliminary “fast” test on food supply chain conduct. For this purpose theoretical model validation is however necessary using Monte Carlo simulations. In this line, further improvements relates to explicitly modeling food processing-retailing relationships in order to detect for market power on each segment of the supply chain.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 116th Seminar, October 27-30, 2010, Parma, Italy with number 94991.

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Date of creation: 27 Oct 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa116:94991

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Keywords: market power; cointegration; supply chain.; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Labor and Human Capital;

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  1. T. A. Lloyd & S. McCorriston & C. W. Morgan & A. J. Rayner, 2006. "Food scares, market power and price transmission: the UK BSE crisis," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 119-147, June.
  2. Levy, Daniel, et al, 1997. "The Magnitude of Menu Costs: Direct Evidence from Large U.S. Supermarket Chains," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 791-825, August.
  3. Jochen Meyer & Stephan Cramon-Taubadel, 2004. "Asymmetric Price Transmission: A Survey," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 581-611.
  4. Dutta, Shantanu, et al, 1999. "Menu Costs, Posted Prices, and Multiproduct Retailers," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(4), pages 683-703, November.
  5. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
  6. von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan, 1998. "Estimating Asymmetric Price Transmission with the Error Correction Representation: An application to the German Pork Market," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 1-18.
  7. Bailey, DeeVon & Brorsen, B. Wade, 1989. "Price Asymmetry In Spatial Fed Cattle Markets," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 14(02), December.
  8. S. McCorriston & C. W. Morgan & A. J. Rayner, 1998. "Processing Technology, Market Power and Price Transmission," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(2), pages 185-201.
  9. Ian Sheldon & Richard Sperling, 2003. "Estimating the Extent of Imperfect Competition in the Food Industry: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 89-109.
  10. Clarke, Roger & Davies, Stephen W, 1982. "Market Structure and Price-Cost Margins," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 49(195), pages 277-87, August.
  11. M. Ben-Kaabia & José M. Gil, 2007. "Asymmetric price transmission in the Spanish lamb sector," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 53-80, March.
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