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Market And Policy Issues In Micro-Econometric Demand Modeling

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  • Moro, Daniele

Abstract

Micro-econometric demand modelling has been receiving an increasing attention in empirical research, mainly due to the increasing availability of micro-data. In this paper we provide a review of some relevant market and policy issues that can be analysed with the use of micro-data on demand. Problems arising from the treatment of micro-data are revised, mainly with reference to the standard neo-classical framework, although other approaches are also sketched. Finally, building on previous research, a dynamic model accounting for health issues, mainly obesity, is proposed for future research.

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Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain with number 6500.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa107:6500

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Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis; Health Economics and Policy; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

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  8. Sckokai, Paolo & Moro, Daniele & Platoni, Silvia, 2008. "Farm-Level Data Model For Agricultural Policy Analysis: A Two-Way Ecm Approach," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6693, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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