Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Penn State -Cornell Integrated Assessment Model

Contents:

Author Info

  • Barron, Eric
  • Chapman, Duane
  • Khanna, Neha
  • Rose, Adam Z.
  • Schultz, Peter A.
  • Kasting, James F.

Abstract

In the past decade dynamic geoeconomic climate modelling has been successful in integrating basic relations in macroeconomic growth and climatology. Now physical scientists and economists at The Penn State University and Cornell University propose to link transient annual climate modelling with the greenhouse gas emissions resulting from a macroeconomic-energy model. In climatological terminology, this is a 3-dimensional General Circulation Model with detailed time and geographic data at the 4.5 degree latitude by 7.5 degree longitude level. The integrated model analysis may proceed up to periods with 10-15 times today's CO2 equivalent concentration level. Feedback effects include space heating and cooling energy demand, and natural ecosystem relationships such as CO2 fertilization and terrestrial CH4 release. In the macroeconomic submodel, an augmented Hotelling analysis incorporates long-term depletion with short-term rising market equilibrium values which reflect growing populations and income. Energy demand is explicitly represented by demand functions, as is the possibility of renewable energy, conservation, or nuclear substitution for fossil fuel, as well as the substitution of coal-based energy services for those now provided by petroleum and natural gas. On a detailed regionally disaggregated level, climate change interactions would be studied for agriculture, morbidity and mortality, sea level rise, and income levels. The Framework Convention on Climate Change charges policy makers to find stable greenhouse gas concentrations "at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The Penn State-Cornell Integrated Assessment Model would assist in defining those concentration levels, and the national and international policy pathways such as marketable permits or taxation.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/127929
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management in its series Working Papers with number 127929.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Dec 1996
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:127929

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Warren Hall, Ithaca NY 14853
Fax: 607-255-9984
Web page: http://aem.cornell.edu/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William D & Shaw, Daigee, 1994. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A Ricardian Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 753-71, September.
  2. Xiaohua, Wang & Zhenming, Fend, 1996. "Survey of rural household energy consumption in China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 21(7), pages 703-705.
  3. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1990. "CO2 Emission Limits: An Economic Cost Analysis for the USA," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 51-74.
  4. Schelling, Thomas C, 1995. "Intergenerational discounting," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 395-401.
  5. Adam Rose & Shih-Mo Lin, 1995. "Regrets or No Regrets -- That is the Question: Is Conservation an Costless CO2 Mitigation Strategy?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 67-88.
  6. Stephen C Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1992. "CETA: A Model for Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 55-78.
  7. Azar, Christian & Sterner, Thomas, 1996. "Discounting and distributional considerations in the context of global warming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 169-184, November.
  8. William D. Nordhaus, 1992. "Rolling the 'Dice': An Optimal Transition Path for Controlling Greenhouse Gases," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1019, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  9. Peck, Stephen C & Teisberg, Thomas J, 1995. "International CO2 emissions control : An analysis using CETA," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 297-308.
  10. Neha Khanna & Duane Chapman, 1996. "Time Preference, Abatement Costs, And International Climate Policy: An Appraisal Of Ipcc 1995," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(2), pages 56-66, 04.
  11. Manne, Alan S, 1995. "The rate of time preference : Implications for the greenhouse debate," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 391-394.
  12. Tol, Richard S. J., 1994. "The damage costs of climate change: a note on tangibles and intangibles, applied to DICE," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 436-438, May.
  13. Hulme, Mike & Raper, Sarah CB & Wigley, Tom ML, 1995. "An integrated framework to address climate change (ESCAPE) and further developments of the global and regional climate modules (MAGICC)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 347-355.
  14. Rose, Adam & Stevens, Brandt, 1993. "The efficiency and equity of marketable permits for CO2 emissions," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 117-146, March.
  15. Frankhauser, Samuel & Tol, Richard SJ, 1996. "Climate change costs : Recent advancements in the economic assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(7), pages 665-673, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Khanna, Neha & Chapman, Duane, 1997. "A Critical Overview of the Economic Structure of Integrated Assessment Models of Climate Change," Working Papers 127883, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:cudawp:127929. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.