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International Product Differentiation Through a Country Brand: An Economic Analysis of National Branding as a Marketing Strategy for Agricultural Products

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Author Info

  • Innes, Brian G.
  • Kerr, William A.
  • Hobbs, Jill E.

Abstract

Trade policy initiatives of developed country governments are in flux. Governments’ need for new trade policy measures has arisen partly because of constraints imposed on the use of export subsidies by the Agreement on Agriculture reached as part of the Uruguay Round of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in 1994. Further disciplines on export subsidies and other policy measures may be agreed on in the Doha Round of World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations, accentuating the need for new policy measures. While the Doha Round may not successfully reach an agreement, the current modalities show provisional agreement on the elimination of multiple forms of export subsidies. There is provisional agreement on more stringent restrictions on the use of export credit programs. Controls on exporting state trading agencies’ ability to subsidize exports are tentatively agreed (Furtan, 2005). Food aid, which can also be used to circumvent disciplines on export subsidies, is also likely to be subject to WTO disciplines.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network in its series Trade Policy Briefs with number 43470.

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Date of creation: Apr 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:catptp:43470

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Related research

Keywords: branding; marketing; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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  1. Giannakas, Konstantinos & Fulton, Murray, 2002. "Consumption effects of genetic modification: what if consumers are right?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 97-109, August.
  2. Hayes, Dermot J. & Lence, Sergio H. & Stoppa, Andrea, 2004. "Farmer-Owned Brands?," Staff General Research Papers 11285, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Jayson L. Lusk & Jason Brown & Tyler Mark & Idlir Proseku & Rachel Thompson & Jody Welsh, 2006. "Consumer Behavior, Public Policy, and Country-of-Origin Labeling," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 28(2), pages 284-292.
  4. Roxanne Clemens & Bruce A. Babcock, 2004. "Country of Origin as a Brand: The Case of New Zealand Lamb," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 04-mbp9, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  5. Colin Carter & Barry Krissoff & Alix Peterson Zwane, 2006. "Can Country-of-Origin Labeling Succeed as a Marketing Tool for Produce? Lessons from Three Case Studies," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(4), pages 513-530, December.
  6. Vincent, Michel, 2007. "Extending Protection at the WTO to Products Other Than Wines and Spirits: Who Will Benefit?," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 8(1).
  7. Miguel Carriquiry & Bruce A. Babcock & Roxana Carbone, 2003. "Optimal Quality Assurance Systems for Agricultural Outputs," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 03-wp328, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  8. Rude, James & Meilke, Karl D., 2005. "Canadian Agriculture and the Doha Development Agenda: The Challenges," Working Papers 24157, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
  9. Thomas L. Sporleder & Peter D. Goldsmith, 2001. "Alternative Firm Strategies for Signaling Quality in the Food System," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 49(4), pages 591-604, December.
  10. Furtan, William Hartley, 2005. "Transformative Change in Agriculture: The Canadian Wheat Board," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 6(2).
  11. Darby, Michael R & Karni, Edi, 1973. "Free Competition and the Optimal Amount of Fraud," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 67-88, April.
  12. Gabriele Jahn & Matthias Schramm & Achim Spiller, 2005. "The Reliability of Certification: Quality Labels as a Consumer Policy Tool," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 53-73, December.
  13. Nijssen, Edwin J & Van Trijp, Hans C M, 1998. "Branding Fresh Food Products: Exploratory Empirical Evidence from the Netherlands," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 228-42.
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