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Determinants of Food Security in Kenya, a Gender Perspective

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  • Kassie, Menale
  • Ndiritu, Simon Wagura
  • Shiferaw, Bekele A.

Abstract

The paper contributes to an understanding of the determinants of food security with a bias on the link between gender of household head and food security using detailed farm household and plot level survey data from 30 divisions in rural Kenya. Both parametric and non-parametric econometric techniques are used to ensure robustness of the results from the econometric analyses. Since the assumption of pooled regression is rejected, we run separate food security regressions at plot level both for Male Headed Households (MHHs) and Female Headed Households (FHHs). Both descriptive and econometrics results shows that FHHs in general are more likely to be food insecure compared to their male counterparts. The analysis further reveals that Female Headed Households‘ food security increases with quality of extension workers; land quality, farm size while distance to the market reduces the probability of food security. For the quality of extension staff, policy makers should focus on improving the skill of extension staff for efficient and effective dissemination of technologies and other important information that has impact on food security. Since area expansion is infeasible due to land scarcity in Kenya, policy makers focusing on land augmenting practices can help farm households to escape food insecurity.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural Economics Society in its series 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK with number 135124.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc12:135124

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Keywords: food security; gender; parametric and non-parametric methods; Kenya; Food Security and Poverty; O13; Q18;

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  1. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2003. "Food aid and child nutrition in rural Ethiopia," FCND discussion papers 158, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Peterman, Amber & Behrman, Julia & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IFPRI discussion papers 975, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Markus Fr�lich, 2007. "Propensity score matching without conditional independence assumption--with an application to the gender wage gap in the United Kingdom," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 10(2), pages 359-407, 07.
  4. Alberto Abadie & David Drukker & Jane Leber Herr & Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Implementing matching estimators for average treatment effects in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 290-311, September.
  5. James J. Heckman & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2007. "Econometric Evaluation of Social Programs, Part I: Causal Models, Structural Models and Econometric Policy Evaluation," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 70 Elsevier.
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