Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

On The Role Of The Brokerage Institution In The Development Of Ethiopian Agricultural Markets

Contents:

Author Info

  • Quattri, Maria A.
  • Ozanne, Adam
  • Wang, Xioabing
  • Hall, Alastair R.

Abstract

The recognition that policies aimed at “getting prices right” in less developed countries were failing due to incomplete markets has spurred a new wave of reforms, directed instead at “getting markets and institutions right”. Although previous studies have documented the potentially crucial role of the brokerage institution in crop commercialisation, few have investigated what determines wholesalers’ decisions to use brokers. Using data collected in 2006/07 by Gabre-Madhin, IFPRI and EDRI, we examine Ethiopian traders’ decisions regarding whether or not they should use brokers, and how much. Independent variables are human, financial and social asset availability, implemented trading practices, access to infrastructure and institutions, location, travelled distance and traded crops. Results show that brokerage services are particularly valuable for wholesalers lacking social capital and storage capacity, who are based in areas with low population density, and who trade at a distance especially when roads are not asphalted. Buyers in drought-prone domains rely on brokers more for their long-distance purchases, while sellers in moisture-reliable domains employ brokers more for their long-distance sales. These results provide useful indications regarding where and how the recent formalisation of brokerage functions through the ECX could be most beneficial for the functioning of Ethiopian agricultural markets.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/108941
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural Economics Society in its series 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK with number 108941.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Apr 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc11:108941

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.aes.ac.uk/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Agribusiness; O12; O13; O18;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Fafchamps, Marcel & Minten, Bart, 1998. "Relationships and traders in Madagascar," MTID discussion papers 24, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Takashi Yamagata & Chris Orme, 2005. "On Testing Sample Selection Bias Under the Multicollinearity Problem," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 467-481.
  3. Negassa, Asfaw & Jayne, Thomas S., 1997. "The Response of Ethiopian Grain Markets to Liberalization," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55595, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. David Madden, 2006. "Sample Selection Versus Two-Part Models Revisited: the Case of Female Smoking and Drinking," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 06/12, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  5. Dessalegn, Gebremeskel & Jayne, Thomas S. & Shaffer, James D., 1998. "Market Structure, Conduct, and Performance: Constraints of Performance of Ethiopian Grain Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55597, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  6. Melino, Angelo, 1982. "Testing for Sample Selection Bias," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 151-53, January.
  7. Leung, S.F. & Yu, S., 1992. "On the Choice Between Sample Selection and Two-Part Models," RCER Working Papers 337, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  8. Rashid, Shahidur & Minot, Nicholas, 2010. "Are Staple Food Markets in Africa Efficient? Spatial Price Analyses and Beyond," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 58562, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  9. Jayne, Thomas S. & Negassa, Asfaw & Myers, Robert J., 1998. "The Effect of Liberalization on Grain Prices and Marketing Margins in Ethiopia," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54681, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  10. Marcel Fafchamps & Jan Willem Gunning and Remco Oostendorp, 1999. "Inventories and risk in African manufacturing," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1999-19, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  11. Osborne, Theresa, 2005. "Imperfect competition in agricultural markets: evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 405-428, April.
  12. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Haggblade, Steven, 2003. "Successes in African agriculture," MSSD discussion papers 53, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  13. Chamberlin, Jordan & Pender, John & Yu, Bingxin, 2006. "Development domains for Ethiopia: capturing the geographical context of smallholder development options," DSGD discussion papers 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Fafchamps, Marcel & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni, 2001. "Agricultural markets in Benin and Malawi : the operation and performance of traders," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2734, The World Bank.
  15. Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 2001. "Social Capital and Agricultural Trade," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 680-685.
  16. Pessoa, Andre S.M. & Jank, Marcos Sawaya, 2002. "Grain Markets: A South-American Perspective," Agricultural Outlook Forum 2002 33495, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Outlook Forum.
  17. Kherallah, Mylène & Kirsten, Johann, 2001. "The new institutional economics," MSSD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  18. Christopher F Baum, 2006. "An Introduction to Modern Econometrics using Stata," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number imeus, March.
  19. Rimal, Arbindra & Balasubramanian, Siva K. & Moon, Wanki, 2004. "Two-Stage Decision Model Of Soy Food Consumption Behavior," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20096, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aesc11:108941. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.