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Regional, sectoral and temporal differences in carbon leakage

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  • Lennox, James
  • Turner, James
  • Daigneault, Adam
  • Jhunjhnuwala, Kanika

Abstract

While greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes, taxes and other measures have already been implemented or are proposed in many countries and regions, global action to mitigate climate change remains insufficient. A major concern in many countries is that actions taken alone, or even in a limited coalition of countries, might result in competitive disadvantage to firms in emissions-intensive, tradeexposed industries. Additionally, this might results in emissions leakage, reducing environmental effectiveness. The problem of emissions leakage has been extensively studied in the case of mitigation by individual or coalitions of developed countries, most often, using comparative static partial or general equilibrium models. In this paper we use a multiregional dynamic general equilibrium model to study the imposition of harmonised carbon taxes on industrial and energy greenhouse gas emissions in OECD countries and in China. This tax rate is increasing over time. We find that the overall rate of emissions leakage is very low and decreases over time. We also find significant differences between regions in the marginal rates of leakage with respect to their participation (or not) in the carbon-pricing coalition. Differences in leakage rates and their change over time can be related to differences in energy systems, general economic structure and growth rates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia with number 152164.

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Date of creation: Feb 2013
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aare13:152164

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Keywords: carbon price; emissions; leakage; general equilibrium; Environmental Economics and Policy; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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  1. Felder Stefan & Rutherford Thomas F., 1993. "Unilateral CO2 Reductions and Carbon Leakage: The Consequences of International Trade in Oil and Basic Materials," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 162-176, September.
  2. Lau, Morten I. & Pahlke, Andreas & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2002. "Approximating infinite-horizon models in a complementarity format: A primer in dynamic general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 577-609, April.
  3. Uzawa, H, 1969. "Time Preference and the Penrose Effect in a Two-Class Model of Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(4), pages 628-52, Part II, .
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  5. Corrado Di Maria & Edwin van der Werf, 2006. "Carbon Leakage Revisited: Unilateral Climate Policy with Directed Technical Change," Working Papers 2006.94, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  6. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00009337 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Chunbo Ma & David I. Stern, 2006. "China's Changing Energy Intensity Trend: A Decomposition Analysis," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0615, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  8. Larry Karp, 2011. "The Environment and Trade," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 397-417, October.
  9. Sergey V. Paltsev, 2001. "The Kyoto Protocol: Regional and Sectoral Contributions to the Carbon Leakage," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 53-80.
  10. Burniaux, Jean-Marc & Oliveira Martins, Joaquim, 2012. "Carbon leakages : a general equilibrium view," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/7970, Paris Dauphine University.
  11. Caron, Justin, 2012. "Estimating carbon leakage and the efficiency of border adjustments in general equilibrium — Does sectoral aggregation matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages S111-S126.
  12. Jean-Marc Burniaux & Joaquim Oliveira Martins, 2000. "Carbon Emission Leakages: A General Equilibrium View," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 242, OECD Publishing.
  13. Gielen, Dolf & Moriguchi, Yuichi, 2002. "CO2 in the iron and steel industry: an analysis of Japanese emission reduction potentials," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(10), pages 849-863, August.
  14. Christoph Böhringer & Jared C. Carbone & Thomas F. Rutherford, 2012. "Efficiency and Equity Implications of Alternative Instruments to Reduce Carbon Leakage," Working Papers V-346-12, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2012.
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