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The Use Of Economic Instruments In Transitional Circumstances As A Tool For Sustainable Environmental Policy: Case Study Of Macedonian Path To Meet Globalization Challenges

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  • Nedanovski, Pece
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    Abstract

    The demand for harmonization of domestic policies across countries is seen as a precondition for globalization. Does globalization conflict with environmental protection? The relationship between two of them is too complex. From the viewpoint of its protection, the environment must be seen as a whole. In the same time, the utility function based on income and pollution, is not identical and homothetic across different countries. It appears that the diversity in environmental protection is legitimate. In order to provide a sustainable environmental policy in transitional circumstances, the R. of Macedonia needs a balance between the goals of social development, economic progress and environmental protection. So far, because of the institutional development gap, only few economic instruments have been implemented in environmental protection in Macedonia. Consequently, the environmental policy including economic instruments should be considered with a view to balance the environmental achievements with its social and economic implications.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2008 Conference (52nd), February 5-8, 2008, Canberra, Australia with number 5994.

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    Date of creation: 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aare08:5994

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    Keywords: economic instruments; environmental protection; sustainability; globalization; Environmental Economics and Policy; International Development;

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    1. Werner Antweiler & Brian R. Copeland & M. Scott Taylor, 1998. "Is Free Trade Good for the Environment?," NBER Working Papers 6707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Judith M. Dean, 2002. "Does trade liberalization harm the environment? A new test," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 819-842, November.
    3. Arik Levinson & M. Scott Taylor, 2004. "Unmasking the Pollution Haven Effect," NBER Working Papers 10629, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Liddle, Brantley, 2001. "Free trade and the environment-development system," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 21-36, October.
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