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Valuing the environment in developing countries: Problems and potentials

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  • Alam, Khorshed
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    Abstract

    Non-market valuation techniques have often been transferred to developing countries without taking into account their social, economic, political and cultural settings. For instance, the same kind of elicitation method is applied in developing countries, although many of the respondents are extremely poor and many of their economic activities are outside the purview of the monetary mechanism. This paper reports research in a developing country context where the conventional contingent valuation method is extended to include respondents’ preference in terms of time for the restoration of a vulnerable river, irrespective of their decision to contribute money.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/137741
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2005 Conference (49th), February 9-11, 2005, Coff's Harbour, Australia with number 137741.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aare05:137741

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    Keywords: Buriganga River; contingent valuation; framing issue; Environmental Economics and Policy; International Development;

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    1. KyeongAe Choe & Dale Whittington & Donald T. Lauria, 1996. "The Economic Benefits of Surface Water Quality Improvements in Developing Countries: A Case Study of Davao, Philippines," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 72(4), pages 519-537.
    2. Edward B. Barbier & Mark Cox, 2003. "Does Economic Development Lead to Mangrove Loss? A Cross-Country Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(4), pages 418-432, October.
    3. Russell, Clifford S., 2001. "Applying Economics to the Environment," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195126846, September.
    4. Dale Whittington, 1996. "Administering Contingent Valuation Surveys in Developing Countries," EEPSEA Special and Technical Paper sp199601t1, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Jan 1996.
    5. Peter A. Diamond & Jerry A. Hausman, 1994. "Contingent Valuation: Is Some Number Better than No Number?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 45-64, Fall.
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