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Valuation of Safety-Branded and Traceable Free Range Chicken in Ha Noi: Results from a Field Experiment

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  • Ifft, Jennifer
  • Roland-Holst, David W.
  • Zilberman, David

Abstract

The valuation of traceable or safety-branded food by consumers in developing countries affected by diseases such as avian influenza, or with food safety issues in general, is very difficult to identify. Products that have safety-branding are not common, and food is usually purchased by bargaining at informal markets. However, valuation of traceability has important implications for livestock disease policies as well as agricultural sector development. Through developing a short-term certified supply chain for free range chicken in Hanoi, we were able to conduct a combined field experiment and detailed household survey to measure the valuation of this type of poultry. We find that consumers in urban Hanoi on average have a welfare gain of about $1 per whole chicken purchase for safety-branding and traceability, which translates into a potential annual consumer welfare gain of $66 million for such characteristics.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin with number 49444.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea09:49444

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Related research

Keywords: field experiments; avian influenza; Vietnam; food safety; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; C93; D12; Q13; Q18;

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