Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Personal Indebtedness, Spatial Effects and Crime

Contents:

Author Info

  • McIntyre, Stuart G.
  • Lacombe, Donald J.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    There is a long and detailed history of attempts to understand what causes crime. One of the most prominent strands of this literature has sought to better understand the relationship between economic conditions and crime. Following Becker (1968), the economic argument is that in an attempt to maintain consumption in the face of unemployment, people may resort to sources of illicit income. In a similar manner, we might expect ex–ante, that increases in the level of personal indebtedness would be likely to provide similar incentives to engage in criminality. In this paper we seek to understand the spatial pattern of property and theft crimes using a range of socioeconomic variables, including data on the level of personal indebtedness.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://repo.sire.ac.uk/handle/10943/418
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE) in its series SIRE Discussion Papers with number 2012-83.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea07:418

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 31 Buccleuch Place, EH8 9JT, Edinburgh
    Phone: +44(0)1316508361
    Fax: +44(0)1316504514
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.sire.ac.uk
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Spatial Econometrics; Crime; Personal Debt; Economic Conditions;

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. McIntyre Stuart G, 2013. "Personal indebtedness, community characteristics and theft crimes," Working Papers 1320, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    2. Entorf, Horst, 2013. "Criminal Victims, Victimized Criminals, or Both? A Deeper Look at the Victim-Offender Overlap," IZA Discussion Papers 7686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Luca Zanin & Rosalba Radice & Giampiero Marra, 2013. "Estimating the Effect of Perceived Risk of Crime on Social Trust in the Presence of Endogeneity Bias," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 114(2), pages 523-547, November.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea07:418. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gina Reddie).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.