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Getting Something From Nothing: An Investigation of Beef Demand Expansion and Substitution in the Presence of Quality Heterogeneity

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Author Info

  • Gunderson, Michael A.
  • Lusk, Jayson L.
  • Norwood, F. Bailey

Abstract

A relative increase in demand for quality can have one of two potentially countervailing effects: it can cause substitution of one quality for another and/or it might expand overall demand by bringing new consumers into the market. This article investigates demand expansion and substitution among beef qualities by exploiting the use of a no-purchase option in a nonhypothetical choice experiment involving real food and real money. A random parameters logit model, which permits very flexible substitution patterns, is used to show that expanding demand for high quality rib-eye steak increases revenue by a greater degree than expanding demand for low quality steak. Regardless of whether high or low quality demand is expanded, the expansion effect dominates the substitution effect. We also show that the introduction of a new “"natural”" steak causes a greater reduction in market share for high quality than low quality beef, but despite this overall steak demand increases. These results have important implications for the manner in which collective advertising is conducted and for the effects of new product introductions on industry profitability.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI with number 19465.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea05:19465

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Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis;

References

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  1. Brownstone, David & Train, Kenneth, 1999. "Forecasting new product penetration with flexible substitution patterns," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1j6814b3, University of California Transportation Center.
  2. John Crespi & Stéphan Marette, 2002. "Generic Advertising and Product Differentiation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(3), pages 691-701.
  3. Julian M. Alston & John W. Freebairn & Jennifer S. James, 2001. "Beggar-Thy-Neighbor Advertising: Theory and Application to Generic Commodity Promotion Programs," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 888-902.
  4. Nicholas E. Piggott, 2000. "The Incidence of the Costs and Benefits of Generic Advertising," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 665-671.
  5. David Revelt & Kenneth Train, 1998. "Mixed Logit With Repeated Choices: Households' Choices Of Appliance Efficiency Level," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 647-657, November.
  6. Lusk,Jayson L. & Shogren,Jason F., 2007. "Experimental Auctions," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671248, April.
  7. Jayson Lusk & T Feldkamp & T Schroeder, 2004. "Experimental auction procedure: Impact on valuation of quality differentiated goods," Artefactual Field Experiments 00097, The Field Experiments Website.
  8. Jeffrey Hyde & Kenneth Foster, 2003. "Estimating Dynamic Relationships between Pork Advertising and Revenues," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(2), pages 279-293.
  9. Jayson L. Lusk & Jutta Roosen & John A. Fox, 2003. "Demand for Beef from Cattle Administered Growth Hormones or Fed Genetically Modified Corn: A Comparison of Consumers in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 16-29.
  10. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
  11. Small, Kenneth A & Rosen, Harvey S, 1981. "Applied Welfare Economics with Discrete Choice Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(1), pages 105-30, January.
  12. repec:feb:artefa:0069 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Jayson L. Lusk & Ted C. Schroeder, 2004. "Are Choice Experiments Incentive Compatible? A Test with Quality Differentiated Beef Steaks," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(2), pages 467-482.
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