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Does The Stolper-Samuelson Theorem Hold With Less Trade Distortion?: A Computable General Equilibrium

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  • Bittencourt, Mauricio V.L.

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of agricultural trade policy changes in the Brazilian agriculture using CGE model. An extended Salter-Swan model is employed to verify if the Stolper-Samuelson theorem holds and the consequences in terms of prices, production and resources allocation. Results show that the Stolper-Samuelson hypothesis is reversed when imports and domestic goods are poor substitutes. The reduction in the import tariff increases national income, implying that inappropriate trade policy adjustments can stand in the way of promoting rapid and equitable growth of the economy.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada with number 22173.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22173

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Keywords: Stolper-Samuelson theorem; CGE model; trade distortion; Brazilian agriculture.; International Relations/Trade;

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  1. Robinson, Sherman & Thierfelder, Karen, 1999. "A note on taxes, prices, wages, and welfare in general equilibirium models:," TMD discussion papers 39, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Ronald W. Jones, 1965. "The Structure of Simple General Equilibrium Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 557.
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  4. Thierfelder, Karen & Robinson, Sherman, 2002. "Trade and tradability," TMD discussion papers 93, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Löfgren, Hans & Harris, Rebecca Lee & Robinson, Sherman, 2001. "A standard computable general equilibrium (CGE) model in GAMS," TMD discussion papers 75, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Gopinath, Munisamy & Roe, Terry L., 1999. "Modeling inter-sectoral growth linkages: An application to U.S. agriculture," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 21(2), October.
  7. Bautista, Romeo M, et al, 2001. "Policy Bias and Agriculture: Partial and General Equilibrium Measures," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 89-104, February.
  8. Cattaneo, Andrea & Ojeda, Raul A. Hinojosa- & Robinson, Sherman, 1999. "Costa Rica trade liberalization, fiscal imbalances, and macroeconomic policy: a computable general equilibrium model," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 39-67.
  9. Rassekh, Farhad & Thompson, Henry, 1997. "Adjustment in General Equilibrium: Some Industrial Evidence," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 20-31, February.
  10. Davies, Rob & Rattso, Jorn & Torvik, Ragnar, 1998. "Short-Run Consequences of Trade Liberalization: A Computable General Equilibrium Model of Zimbabwe," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 305-333, June.
  11. Wen Cheng & Jeffrey Sachs & Xiaokai Yang, 2000. "A general-equilibrium re-appraisal of the Stolper-Samuelson theorem," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 72(1), pages 1-18, February.
  12. Lloyd, Peter, 2000. "Generalizing the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem: A Tale of Two Matrices," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 597-613, November.
  13. Andrea Cattaneo, 2001. "Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: Comparing the Impacts of Macroeconomic Shocks, Land Tenure, and Technological Change," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(2), pages 219-240.
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