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Working Paper 149 - Accounting for Poverty in Africa: Illustration with Survey Data from Nigeria

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Abstract

Apart from presenting the poverty profile, this paper examines the correlates of poverty with multivariate models that predict the probability of being poor using data from the Nigerian National Consumer Survey (NCS) of 2003/2004. The probability of a household being poor was examined for the nation as a whole, as well as male-headed and female-headed households and for urban/rural geographical areas. In particular, the variables that are positively and significantly correlated with the probability of being poor nationally are: household size, lack of education, residence in the North Central zone, being single, and being a Moslem. The variables that are negatively and significantly correlated with the probability of being poor are: age of the household head, quadratic of household size, residence in an urban area, post-secondary (tertiary) education attainment, being a Christian, and residence in the south south, southeast, south west, and north east zones of the country. Based on the results, we recommend a number of policy interventions (including a broad poverty reduction framework) necessary to reduce poverty in Nigeria and similar African countries.

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Paper provided by African Development Bank in its series Working Paper Series with number 383.

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Date of creation: 14 May 2012
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Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:383

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  1. John Anyanwu & Andrew E. O. Erhijakpor, 2010. "Do International Remittances Affect Poverty in Africa?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 22(1), pages 51-91.
  2. Valerie Rhoe & Suresh Babu & William Reidhead, 2008. "An analysis of food security and poverty in Central Asia-case study from Kazakhstan," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 452-465.
  3. Evelyn Lehrer & Carmel Chiswick, 1993. "Religion as a determinant of marital stability," Demography, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 385-404, August.
  4. Ira N. Gang & Myeong-Su Yun & Kunal Sen, 2002. "Caste, Ethnicity and Poverty in Rural India," Departmental Working Papers 200225, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  5. World Bank, 2011. "World Development Indicators 2011," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2315, October.
  6. Bastos, Amélia & Casaca, Sara F. & Nunes, Francisco & Pereirinha, José, 2009. "Women and poverty: A gender-sensitive approach," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 764-778, October.
  7. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-13 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Gupta, Nabanita Datta & Dubey, Amaresh, 2003. "Poverty and Fertility - An Instrumental Variables Analysis on Indian Micro Data," Working Papers 03-11, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  9. Foster, James & Greer, Joel & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "A Class of Decomposable Poverty Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 761-66, May.
  10. Lanjouw, Peter & Ravallion, Martin & DEC, 1994. "Poverty and household size," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1332, The World Bank.
  11. John Anyanwu, 2005. "Rural Poverty in Nigeria: Profile, Determinants and Exit Paths," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 17(3), pages 435-460.
  12. Arnstein Aassve & Henriette Engelhardt & Francesca Francavilla & Abbi Kedir & Jungho Kim & Fabrizia Mealli & Letizia Mencarini & Stephen Pudney & Alexia Prskawetz, 2005. "Poverty and Fertility in Less Developed Countries: A Comparative Analysis," Discussion Papers in Economics 05/28, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
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