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Now or never! The effect of deadlines on charitable giving: Evidence from a natural field experiment

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Author Info

  • Mette Trier Damgaard

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark)

  • Christina Gravert

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University, Denmark)

Abstract

This study designs two field experiments to estimate the effect of binding deadlines and reminders on charitable giving. We sent out 62,000 e-mails and text messages to prior donors of a large Danish charity while varying the length of the deadline and whether they received a reminder. We find that a reminder increases both the likelihood of making a donation and the amount donated. We find no effect of the deadlines on the propensity to give. Instead we observe a “now-or-never” effect; either donations are made immediately or not at all. In line with the “avoiding-the-ask” theory, both shorter deadlines and the reminder increase the number of requests to be taken off the mailing list.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series Economics Working Papers with number 2014-03.

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Length: 16
Date of creation: 14 Jan 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2014-03

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Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

Related research

Keywords: Field experiment; charitable contributions; time preferences; avoiding-the-ask;

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References

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  1. Dean Karlan & John A. List, 2006. "Does Price Matter in Charitable Giving? Evidence From a Large-Scale Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 12338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Huck, Steffen & Rasul, Imran, 2010. "Matched Fundraising: Evidence from a Natural Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5267, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Matthew Rabin & Ted O'Donoghue, 1999. "Doing It Now or Later," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 103-124, March.
  4. Karlan, Dean & List, John A. & Shafir, Eldar, 2011. "Small matches and charitable giving: Evidence from a natural field experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(5), pages 344-350.
  5. Stefano DellaVigna & John A. List & Ulrike Malmendier, 2009. "Testing for Altruism and Social Pressure in Charitable Giving," NBER Working Papers 15629, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Ben Gilbert & Joshua S. Graff Zivin, 2013. "Dynamic Salience with Intermittent Billing: Evidence from Smart Electricity Meters," NBER Working Papers 19510, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Laibson, David I., 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," Scholarly Articles 4481499, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Keith M. Marzilli Ericson, 2011. "Forgetting We Forget: Overconfidence And Memory," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 43-60, 02.
  9. repec:feb:framed:0087 is not listed on IDEAS
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