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Does the Gap in Family-Friendly Policies Drive the Family Gap?

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Author Info

  • Helena Skyt Nielsen
  • Marianne Simonsen
  • Mette Verner

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Aarhus, Denmark)

Abstract

A segregation of the labour market into a family-friendly and a non-family friendly sector has the effect that women self-select into the sectors depending on institutional constraints, preferences for family-friendly working conditions and expected wage differences. We find that neglecting the sector dimension tends to understate the effect of birth-related interruptions in both sectors. The combined effect of a large depreciation effect and no recovery means that females in the non-family friendly sector (e.g. private sector) are punished severely after childbirth. In the family friendly sector (e.g. public sector), we find complete catching up.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series Economics Working Papers with number 2003-1.

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Length: 38
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Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2003-1

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Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

Related research

Keywords: Fertility; family gap; career interruptions; wages; public vs. private sector;

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  1. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1991. "Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 282-307.
  2. Joshi, Heather & Paci, Pierella & Waldfogel, Jane, 1999. "The Wages of Motherhood: Better or Worse?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(5), pages 543-64, September.
  3. Hartog, Joop & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1993. "Public and private sector wages in the Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 97-114, January.
  4. Gupta, N.D. & Smith, N., 2000. "Children and Career Interruptions: the Family Gap in Denmark," Papers 00-03, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research, Danmark-.
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  8. Dustmann, Christian & van Soest, Arthur, 1998. "Public and private sector wages of male workers in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1417-1441, September.
  9. Preston, Anne E, 1990. "Women in the White-Collar Nonprofit Sector: The Best Option or the Only Option?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(4), pages 560-68, November.
  10. Shelley Phipps & Peter Burton & Lynn Lethbridge, 2001. "In and out of the labour market: long-term income consequences of child-related interruptions to women's paid work," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 411-429, May.
  11. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
  12. Glewwe, Paul, 1996. "The relevance of standard estimates of rates of return to schooling for education policy: A critical assessment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 267-290, December.
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