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Art, Culture, and New York City, from The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City
[The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City]

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Author Info

  • Elizabeth Currid

    (University of Southern California School of Policy, Planning, and Development)

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    Abstract

    Which is more important to New York City's economy, the gleaming corporate office--or the grungy rock club that launches the best new bands? If you said "office," think again. In The Warhol Economy , Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and music drive the economy of New York as much as--if not more than--finance, real estate, and law. And these creative industries are fueled by the social life that whirls around the clubs, galleries, music venues, and fashion shows where creative people meet, network, exchange ideas, pass judgments, and set the trends that shape popular culture. The implications of Currid's argument are far-reaching, and not just for New York. Urban policymakers, she suggests, have not only seriously underestimated the importance of the cultural economy, but they have failed to recognize that it depends on a vibrant creative social scene. They haven't understood, in other words, the social, cultural, and economic mix that Currid calls the Warhol economy. With vivid first-person reporting about New York's creative scene, Currid takes the reader into the city spaces where the social and economic lives of creativity merge. The book has fascinating original interviews with many of New York's important creative figures, including fashion designers Zac Posen and Diane von Furstenberg, artists Ryan McGinness and Futura, and members of the band Clap Your Hands Say Yeah. The economics of art and culture in New York and other cities has been greatly misunderstood and underrated. The Warhol Economy explains how the cultural economy works--and why it is vital to all great cities.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This chapter was published in: Elizabeth Currid , , pages , 2007.

    This item is provided by Princeton University Press in its series Introductory Chapters with number 8467-1.

    Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8467-1

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    Web page: http://press.princeton.edu

    Related research

    Keywords: fashion; art; music; New York City; creative industries; social life; clubs; galleries; urban policymakers; popular culture;

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    Cited by:
    1. Sebastien Chantelot & Peres Stephanie & Virol Stephane, 2011. "From Talent to Creative City: Towards a conceptual framework," ERSA conference papers ersa11p373, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Pierre-Alexandre Balland & Mathijs De Vaan & Ron Boschma, 2013. "The dynamics of interfirm networks along the industry life cycle: The case of the global video game industry, 1987--2007," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(5), pages 741-765, September.
    3. Scott, Allen J., 2010. "Cultural economy and the creative field of the city," MPRA Paper 32108, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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